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1 - 10 of 37 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

URBANST 20: Exploring Urbanism in San Francisco: Three Urban Adventures to Better Understand Cities

What makes San Francisco distinctive as a city? How have designers, architects, builders and planners shaped the city, and how does their work affect San Francisco and its people? This Urban Studies pop-up class will introduce students to the unique architecture and urbanism of San Francisco. A series of three guided walking tours will provide an insider's perspective on the City's most interesting neighborhoods and will also explore core themes and topics in the field of urban design. An informal 90 minute on-campus discussion and slideshow of student-generated imagery (on the Thursday evening following each tour) will allow for an expanded conversation about the urban environment. This course is intended for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 27Q: The Detective and the City

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong's Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today's related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

URBANST 107: Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

An investigation into urban planning as a democratic practice for facilitating or mitigating change in society and the built environment. We will engage in professional planning practices in focused sessions on transportation, design, housing, environmental policy, demographic research, community organizing and real estate development. Strong emphasis on developing an understanding of the forces that shape urban and regional development, including cultural trends, real estate and labor economics, climate change and the environment, and political organizing and power dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Raya, M. (PI)

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies (HISTORY 107)

Today, for the first time in history, a majority of people live in cities. By 2050, cities will hold two-thirds of the world¿s population. This transformation touches everyone, and raises critical questions. What draws people to live in cities? How will urban growth affect the world¿s environment? Why are cities so divided by race and by class, and what can be done about it? How do cities change who we are, and how can we change cities? In this class, you will learn to see cities in new ways, from the smallest everyday interactions on a city sidewalk to the largest patterns of global migration and trade. We will use specific examples from cities around the world to illustrate the concepts that we learn in class. The course is intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 111: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, PUBLPOL 133)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 121.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nall, C. (PI)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

URBANST 122Z: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (CSRE 133P, POLISCI 133Z, PUBLPOL 103Z)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 123: Approaching Research and the Community (CSRE 146A)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program) or CRSE (Community Research Summer Internship). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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