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1 - 10 of 22 results for: MI ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MI 27SC: Viruses in the News

Viruses are unique biological entities that resemble both living and inanimate objects. Despite their simple structure they include some of the most devastating and ubiquitous causes of human disease. The compelling nature of this topic is illustrated by the recent Ebola epidemic, which emerged coincident with the last time this class was offered. From smallpox to measles to HIV to the common cold, viruses have literally changed the course of human history and impacted evolution. They have also been important experimental tools for probing the molecular nature of key biological processes, and they have been utilized in many key discoveries and Nobel Prize-winning research programs. In books, movies, newspapers, and electronic feeds, viruses continue to make the news on a daily basis. Using contemporary media, content experts, model building, interactive sessions, and field trips, we will explore the essential nature of viruses, what makes them unique, how they are classified, how they more »
Viruses are unique biological entities that resemble both living and inanimate objects. Despite their simple structure they include some of the most devastating and ubiquitous causes of human disease. The compelling nature of this topic is illustrated by the recent Ebola epidemic, which emerged coincident with the last time this class was offered. From smallpox to measles to HIV to the common cold, viruses have literally changed the course of human history and impacted evolution. They have also been important experimental tools for probing the molecular nature of key biological processes, and they have been utilized in many key discoveries and Nobel Prize-winning research programs. In books, movies, newspapers, and electronic feeds, viruses continue to make the news on a daily basis. Using contemporary media, content experts, model building, interactive sessions, and field trips, we will explore the essential nature of viruses, what makes them unique, how they are classified, how they cause disease, key molecular processes, breakthroughs in prevention and treatment, current efforts in trying to eradicate viruses, and cultural iconography pertaining to viruses. In short, this seminar is intended to go viral. Sophomore College course, applications required, due at noon on April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu .
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 70Q: Photographing Nature

Utilizes the idiom of photography to learn about nature, enhance observation, and explore scientific concepts. Builds upon the pioneering photographic work of Eadweard J. Muybridge on human and animal locomotion. A secondary goal is to learn the grammar, syntax, composition, and style of nature photography to enhance the use of this medium as a form of scientific communication and also to explore the themes of change across time and space. Scientific themes to be explored include: taxonomy, habitat preservation, climate change; species diversity; survival and reproductive strategies; ecological niches and coevolution, carrying capacity and sustainability, population densities, predation, and predator-prey relationships, open-space management, the physics of photography. Extensive use of field trips and class critque.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 115C: Human Virology Inquiry Project

Selected topics in human virology focusing on current issues in the field. Topics will include: clinical features of infection, epidemiology, molecular virology, drug development and policy, vaccinology, pathogenesis, host modulation, emerging infection, and media representations of viral infection. Student presentations and discussion in a small group setting. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in MI 155 Humans and Viruses.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 155A: Humans and Viruses I (HUMBIO 155H)

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis is on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: polio and vaccination, smallpox and eradication, yellow fever and history, influenza and genomic diversity, rubella and childhood infections, adenovirus and viral morphology, ebola and emerging infection, lassa fever and immune response. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MI 155B or HUMBIO 155V.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 155B: Humans and Viruses II (HUMBIO 155V)

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: measles and viral epidemiology, rotavirus and world health, rabies and infections of the brain, HPV and cancer -causing viruses, herpes simplex and viral latency, CMV and viral teratogenesis, retrovirology and endogenous viral sequences, HIV and viral treatement, viral hepatitis and chronic infections, prions and diseases of life style. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment with MI155A or HUMBIO 155H.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 155C: Human and Viruses Part III (HUMBIO 155C)

Comprehensive survey of human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Prerequisite: prior enrollment MI 155A/ HUMBIO 155H and MI 155B/ HUMBIO 155V and concurrent enrollment with MI 155D.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 155D: Human and Viruses Part IV (HUMBIO 155D)

Comprehensive survey of human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Prerequisite: prior enrollment in MI 155A/ HUMBIO 155H and MI 155B/ HUMBIO 155V and concurrent enrollment with MI155C.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

MI 185: Topics in Microbiology (MI 285)

For advanced undergraduates and graduate students. 1/3rd of the course consists of lectures by the instructor/colleagues. These cover, at an advanced level, with emphasis on bacteria, topics not covered elsewhere, e.g., phylogeny, molecular regulation, and bioenergetics. The remainder of the course involves interactive discussion of a topic of current interest in microbiology, chosen with student participation, and includes student presentations. (The topic last year was: Gene therapy.) Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for BIO majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X, Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MI 198: Directed Reading in Microbiology and Immunology

Fields of study are decided in consultation with sponsoring professor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MI 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Possible fields: microbial molecular biology and physiology, microbial pathogenicity, immunology, virology, and molecular parasitology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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