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1 - 10 of 34 results for: IPS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

IPS 201: Managing Global Complexity

Is international relations theory valuable for policy makers? The first half of the course will provide students with a foundation in theory by introducing the dominant theoretical traditions and insights in international relations. The second half of the course focuses on several complex global problems that cut across policy specializations and impact multiple policy dimensions. Students will assess the value of major theories and concepts in international relations for analyzing and addressing such complex global policy issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

IPS 202: Topics in International Macroeconomics

Topics: standard theories of open economy macroeconomics, exchange rate regimes, causes and consequences of current account imbalances, the economics of monetary unification and the European Monetary Union, recent financial and currency crises, the International Monetary Fund and the reform of the international financial architecture. Prerequisites: Econ 52 and Econ 165.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 203: Issues in International Economics

Topics in international trade and international trade policy: trade, growth and poverty, the World Trade Organization (WTO), regionalism versus multilateralism, the political economy of trade policy, trade and labor, trade and the environment, and trade policies for developing economies. Prerequisite: ECON 51, ECON 166.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 204A: Microeconomics for Policy (PUBLPOL 51, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 204B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (PUBLPOL 301B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dee, T. (PI)

IPS 207: Economics of Corruption

The role of corruption in the growth and development experience of countries with a focus on the economics of corruption. Topics covered: the concept and measurement of corruption; theory and evidence on the impact of corruption on growth determinants and development outcomes, including public and private investment, financial flows, human capital accumulation, poverty and income inequality; the link between corruption and financial crises, including the recent crises in the US and the Eurozone; the cultural, economic, and political determinants of corruption; and policy measures for addressing corruption, including recent civil society initiatives and use of liberation technology.nPrerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

IPS 207B: Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications (PSYCH 216, PUBLPOL 305B)

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ross, L. (PI)

IPS 209: Practicum

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

IPS 210: The Politics of International Humanitarian Action

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)
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