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1 - 7 of 7 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

In this survey human rights course, students will learn about how the distinct methodologies, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. We will discuss the principal historical and philosophical bases for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international legal frameworks meant to protect and promote these rights. Class sessions will include a mix of seminar discussions and guest lectures by distinguished Stanford faculty from across the university. This course fulfills the gateway course requirement for the minor in Human Rights. HUMRTS 101 was previously listed as GLOBAL 105.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTNLREL 180A, IPS 280)

Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 104: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, SOC 186)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 105: Special Topics: Humanizing War (POLISCI 211A)

War exposes the most barbarous face of human nature, so the notion that societies can impose order and morality on warfare may seem paradoxical and even futile. Yet throughout history, people have sought to¿and indeed succeeded in¿humanize war. Who are the political actors that have attempted this Herculean task? What strategies have they taken to do so? What are the laws, norms, and organizations structure the ways in which wars are fought? This course will answer these questions, drawing primarily from political science theory and evidence.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chu, J. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116)

The course will examine the way in issues now considered to be at the core of human rights concerns have been dealt with in different historical and cultural contexts. The themes of the course will center on human trafficking and slavery, sexual violence, and mass atrocity crimes such as genocide. The course will thus not be a chronological survey but rather thematic and comparative in its approach, including consideration, of course, of ancient societies in Greece, Rome, and China.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 198: Independent Study or Directed Reading in Human Rights

May be repeated for credit. Students using these units toward the Minor in Human Rights must take for a letter grade. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brunner, J. (PI)

HUMRTS 199: Capstone Project: Human Rights Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Minor in Human Rights must enroll in this course for units with their capstone adviser selected as the instructor. Students must agree with their capstone advisor how many units (3-5) their proposed capstone project is worth, and enroll accordingly. This course is open only to Human Rights Minors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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