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1 - 10 of 35 results for: FINANCE ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

FINANCE 121: Undergraduate Finance Research and Discussion Seminar

This seminar is designed to provide some experience with research methods and topics in finance, and to assist undergraduates with career interests in financial research, whether academic or not, with preparation for those careers. The seminar meetings are weekly and discussion based, covering a range of issues and methods in financial economics. Students are expected to prepare a 30-minute research presentation once during the quarter.
Units: 1 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 201: Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: McQuade, T. (PI)

FINANCE 204: Finance - Accelerated

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, the use and valuation of derivative securities (e.g., options and convertible securities), and risk management.nnNo previous background in finance is required or expected, but in comparison with Finance 201, less time will be spent in class on the steps involved in solving basic problems. Therefore, students choosing this course should be relatively comfortable with basic mathematical operations (e.g., expressions involving multiplication of mult more »
This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, the use and valuation of derivative securities (e.g., options and convertible securities), and risk management.nnNo previous background in finance is required or expected, but in comparison with Finance 201, less time will be spent in class on the steps involved in solving basic problems. Therefore, students choosing this course should be relatively comfortable with basic mathematical operations (e.g., expressions involving multiplication of multiple terms, summation of multiple terms, etc.), though familiarity with the underlying finance concepts is not expected. A good diagnostic is to skim Section 4.2 "Rules for Time Travel" (pp. 98-104) in the course textbook, Corporate Finance by Berk and DeMarzo. If you are comfortable with the level of basic mathematics involved (even if the concepts are new), 204 is a good choice. If not, you should consider Finance 201.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 207: Corporations, Finance, and Governance in the Global Economy

As entrepreneurs, global leaders, and change agents tasked with developing transformative solutions of tomorrow, you will need certain skills and tools to interact with and navigate the complex and ever-changing financial landscape. This course focuses on the development of these skills and tools through the analysis of concise real-world financial situations around the globe. Topics include valuation of cash flows and control; the capital structure, payout policy and governance of both mature and entrepreneurial firms; restructuring and managing financial distress; the use of public markets to obtain liquidity and multiple share classes to retain control; financing and governance in venture capital and private equity; the rise of activism; and social responsibility and debates about the objectives of the firms of the present and future.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 211: Corporate Finance: Applications, Techniques, and Models

This course will develop and apply the basic tools and models of corporate finance to real-world corporate decisions. This course is designed to be the second course in the standard finance sequence; that is, it is designed to be the natural follow-up to the Winter Managerial Finance course. This course will develop and extend standard tools and techniques of financial analysis, valuation, and model-building, and apply these methods to a wide range of cases. Case topics will include mergers and acquisitions, private equity, corporate governance, capital structure, agency conflicts, and corporate restructuring. For all of these applications, this course will emphasize the central importance of financial analysis, valuation, and modeling to guiding optimal decision making.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Hebert, B. (PI)

FINANCE 214: Accelerated Corporate Finance: Applications, Techniques, and Models

This course will develop and apply the basic tools and models of corporate finance to real-world corporate decisions. This course is designed to be the second course in the standard finance sequence; that is, it is designed to be the natural follow-up to the Winter Managerial Finance course. This course will develop and extend standard tools and techniques of financial analysis, valuation, and model-building, and apply these methods to a wide range of cases. Case topics will include mergers and acquisitions, private equity, corporate governance, capital structure, agency conflicts, and corporate restructuring. For all of these applications, this course will emphasize the central importance of financial analysis, valuation, and modeling to guiding optimal decision making.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Zwiebel, J. (PI)

FINANCE 229: MSx: Finance

This course covers the foundations of corporate finance including the management of capital structure, financial forecasting, dividend policy, financial distress, cost of capital and capital budgeting. It discusses the major financial decisions made by corporate managers and the impact of those decisions on investors and the value of the firm. Topics include criteria for understanding the valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, market efficiency, and the role of derivative securities, including options. The course also provides coverage of the role of financial markets in the operations of the firm.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 305: Capital Markets and Institutional Investing

This course teaches recent advances in asset allocation and management. We focus on the practical implementation of asset allocation and management tools in allocating assets, selecting asset managers and managing risk. Students apply these tools to real-time data in the computer lab. Topics covered include Asset Allocation; Delegated Asset Management and Manager Selection applied to Mutual Funds, Hedge Funds and Private Equity Funds; Multi-factor models and Factor Investing. The class will be co-taught by Kevin Mak, the director of the Real-Time Investment and Analysis Lab at Stanford. Robert Wallace, the CEO of Stanford Management Company, will guest-lecture.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 315: Innovating for Financial Inclusion

This is a new MBA elective exploring innovative ways start-ups are altering household participation in financial services, by overcoming financial frictions and/or changing behaviors. "Inclusion"€ will be viewed broadly to encompass individuals/households from all socioeconomic classes in all aspects of their financial lives. The focus will be predominantly on start-ups that are disrupting financial services within the US legal and regulatory environment, though we will frequently draw upon lessons learned from welfare-enhancing innovations in the international FinTech sphere.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

FINANCE 319: Private Equity Investing Seminar

This PE Investing seminar launched in 1993 focuses on private equity investing, including investments with control, buyouts, and minority investments at various stages in a company's life. Private equity investing activity has grown significantly over the past 2 decades. This seminar explores selected topics in private equity investing for those MBA students who take the co-requisite course FINANCE 321.01, Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance. Private equity includes both established and early stage companies. The course extends and deepens the entrepreneurial finance area for those with an interest in private equity, venture capital and principal investing, taking a global view. Utilization will be made of original case studies and lecture-discussions, building on the framework of FINANCE 321. The Seminar meets with many outstanding investors. All those registered in F321.01 will also be registered in F319. See yellow Term Sheet put in MBA Boxes in late April. Note: All those registered in F321.02 will also be registered in F329.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: McDonald, J. (PI)
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