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1 - 10 of 121 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others. The course may be taken for either one or two units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 8: Conjure and Manifest: Building a Sustainable Artistic Practice (AFRICAAM 8)

In this course, student-artists spend time investigating their artistic practice as a framework for promoting power, wellness, and creativity; and as a tangible means for navigating the first steps of their artistic careers. We spend time critically examining the philosophies and works of Black artists including James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, RZA (Wu-Tang Clan) and Nayyirah Waheed, in order to explore new visions for the artist as activist, as futurist and as spiritual healer. We then use a mixture of these ideas and our own¿along with meditation and mindfulness experiences¿to begin conjuring and manifesting intimate relationships with our art practice and ourselves. Student-artists will develop creative confidence, formulate game plans for success, and begin to find balance between the uncertainty and ultimate freedom that life as an artist can bring.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

CSRE 10A: Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy (AFRICAAM 10A)

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 10AX: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA: A Celebration Beyond Borders

This Arts Intensive (September) course meets in the Los Angeles region as a Arts Intensive, course with an option for a follow up directed reading in Autumn Qtr 2017.

In September students begin in Los Angeles for an immersion into the region wide exhibition: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA with the guidance of two professors at UCLA's Chicano Research Center. The Arts Intensive course will engage with the exhibition through multiple venues and museums participating in Pacific Standard Time. Shows we will see range from visual and installation works, photography, performance and street art. Professors Chon A. Noriega (UCLA Dept. of Theater, Film and Television) and Charlene Villasenor Black (UCLA Dept. of Art History) will give lectures and guide students exploring the of two specific shows they curated: HOME at LACMA and a photo exhibit at the Gene Autry Museum. These are among two of the projects that students will explore as well as other offerings in the collective PST. Upon the more »
This Arts Intensive (September) course meets in the Los Angeles region as a Arts Intensive, course with an option for a follow up directed reading in Autumn Qtr 2017.

In September students begin in Los Angeles for an immersion into the region wide exhibition: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA with the guidance of two professors at UCLA's Chicano Research Center. The Arts Intensive course will engage with the exhibition through multiple venues and museums participating in Pacific Standard Time. Shows we will see range from visual and installation works, photography, performance and street art. Professors Chon A. Noriega (UCLA Dept. of Theater, Film and Television) and Charlene Villasenor Black (UCLA Dept. of Art History) will give lectures and guide students exploring the of two specific shows they curated: HOME at LACMA and a photo exhibit at the Gene Autry Museum. These are among two of the projects that students will explore as well as other offerings in the collective PST. Upon the return to Stanford students have the option to enroll in directed reading and design their own curatorial projects: visual or performance works that explore the overall themes of LA/LA and gain guidance in mounting those projects on campus.

More about PST: Through a series of thematically linked exhibitions, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will present a wide variety of important works of art, much of them new to Southern California audiences. While the majority of exhibitions will have an emphasis on modern and contemporary art, there also will be crucial exhibitions about the ancient world and the pre-modern era. With topics such as luxury objects in the pre-Columbian Americas, 20th-century Afro-Brazilian art, alternative spaces in Mexico City, and boundary-crossing practices of Latino artists, exhibitions will range from monographic studies of individual artists to broad surveys that cut across numerous countries.

While the exhibitions will focus on the visual arts, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA programs will ultimately expand to touch on music, performance, literature, and even cuisine. Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will be a multifaceted event that will transform Los Angeles and Southern California for five months, and our understanding of modern and contemporary art forever.

Embracing organizations of all sizes and types ¿from the largest museums to smaller museums, from university galleries to performing arts centers¿Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibitions and programs will take place across Southern California, from Santa Barbara to San Diego, from Santa Monica to Palm Springs.

With its historical roots in Latin America and its current demographics, Los Angeles might be described as tomorrow's capital city. In a way that is possible only in Los Angeles, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA will implicitly raise complex and provocative issues about present-day relations throughout the Americas and the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Southern California.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 10AY: Pacific Standard Time LA/LA creative projects in a Celebration Beyond Borders

Students will have the opportunity to develop written and creative responses to the exploration of the region wide collaboration Pacific Standard Time LA/LA.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 10SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (SOC 11SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United St more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. nThis class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (SOC 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the ¿Living Arts¿ of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).nUNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular ¿AAVE Happenin¿ at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 21N: How to Make a Racist (PSYCH 21N)

How do children, with no innate beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complex question, this seminar will introduce students to the cognitive, social, and cultural factors that contribute to the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. We will begin by defining key concepts (e.g., ¿What is race and what is racism?¿), and will then take a developmental approach to examine racist thought from early childhood until adulthood. The seminar will include lectures that will provide an introduction to each topic. These lectures will be supplemented by readings and discussion. Students will engage thoughtfully and critically with the topics and readings by sharing experiences, perspectives, confusions, and insights through discussion and in writing. Students with diverse experiences and perspectives will be welcomed and encouraged to participate.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)
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