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1 - 10 of 18 results for: PEDS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PEDS 106: Exploring Happiness and Health (PEDS 206)

Evidence-based research findings, theoretical concepts and applied experiences related to emotional well-being, and physical and mental health. Topics include basic cognitive neuroscience and psychological research in pro-social emotions, such as gratitude, compassion, forgiveness and mindfulness practice. Course offers lecture, readings, and applied practices that enhance mental health, resiliency and well-being. Emphasis on issues relevant to high-achieving young adults.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

How race/ethnicity and SES contribute to health disparities, how vulnerable populations are uniquely at health risk, and how the built environment relates to health and wellness. Topics include: gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, individual SES and neighborhood SES as related to health; individual and structural race bias; health needs of vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); and environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic/car culture, green space, housing, food access/culture, law enforcement, and media).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PEDS 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading/Research

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Aby, J. (PI) ; Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI) ; Alexander, S. (PI) ; Almond, C. (PI) ; Alvira, C. (PI) ; Amieva, M. (PI) ; Ammerman, S. (PI) ; Amylon, M. (PI) ; Anand, K. (PI) ; Anderson, C. (PI) ; Ariagno, R. (PI) ; Arvin, A. (PI) ; Aye, T. (PI) ; Bacchetta, R. (PI) ; Bachrach, L. (PI) ; Balagtas, J. (PI) ; Barr, D. (PI) ; Bass, D. (PI) ; Benitz, W. (PI) ; Bentley, B. (PI) ; Bergman, D. (PI) ; Bernstein, D. (PI) ; Bernstein, J. (PI) ; Berquist, W. (PI) ; Bhargava, S. (PI) ; Bhutani, V. (PI) ; Bland, R. (PI) ; Blankenberg, F. (PI) ; Blankenburg, R. (PI) ; Bonifacio, S. (PI) ; Bressack, M. (PI) ; Browne, M. (PI) ; Buckingham, B. (PI) ; Buckway, C. (PI) ; Burgos, T. (PI) ; Butte, A. (PI) ; Butte, M. (PI) ; Carlson, J. (PI) ; Carmichael, S. (PI) ; Castillo, R. (PI) ; Castro, R. (PI) ; Ceresnak, S. (PI) ; Chamberlain, L. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, S. (PI) ; Cheng, A. (PI) ; Chin, C. (PI) ; Cho, M. (PI) ; Chock, V. (PI) ; Cohen, H. (PI) ; Cohen, R. (PI) ; Conrad, C. (PI) ; Contag, C. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cornfield, D. (PI) ; Cox, K. (PI) ; Crain, L. (PI) ; Crawley, L. (PI) ; DOSSANTOS, L. (PI) ; Dahl, G. (PI) ; Darmstadt, G. (PI) ; Dekker, C. (PI) ; Dorenbaum, A. (PI) ; Druzin, M. (PI) ; Dubin, A. (PI) ; Edwards, M. (PI) ; Egan, E. (PI) ; El-Sayed, Y. (PI) ; Enns, G. (PI) ; Feinstein, J. (PI) ; Feldman, B. (PI) ; Feldman, H. (PI) ; Fernandes, S. (PI) ; Fisher, J. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Frankel, L. (PI) ; Frankovich, J. (PI) ; Franzon, D. (PI) ; Friedman, I. (PI) ; Gans, H. (PI) ; Garcia-Careag, M. (PI) ; Geertsma, F. (PI) ; Glader, B. (PI) ; Glasscock, G. (PI) ; Golden, N. (PI) ; Gould, J. (PI) ; Govindaswami, B. (PI) ; Grady Jr., S. (PI) ; Grimm, P. (PI) ; Gutierrez, K. (PI) ; Halamek, L. (PI) ; Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI) ; Hammer, G. (PI) ; Hammer, L. (PI) ; Harris, S. (PI) ; Hintz, S. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hood, K. (PI) ; Horwitz, S. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hudgins, L. (PI) ; Huffman, L. (PI) ; Hurwitz, M. (PI) ; Imperial, J. (PI) ; Ismail, M. (PI) ; Jeng, M. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kache, S. (PI) ; Kahana, M. (PI) ; Kapphahn, C. (PI) ; Kaufman, B. (PI) ; Kay, M. (PI) ; Kerner, J. (PI) ; Kharbanda, S. (PI) ; Kim, J. (PI) ; King, B. (PI) ; Koltai, P. (PI) ; Krawczeski, C. (PI) ; Krensky, A. (PI) ; LaBeaud, D. (PI) ; Lacayo, N. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Leonard, M. (PI) ; Lewis, D. (PI) ; Limon, J. (PI) ; Lin, M. (PI) ; Link, M. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Loe, I. (PI) ; Longhurst, C. (PI) ; Loutit, C. (PI) ; Lowe, H. (PI) ; Lowe, J. (PI) ; Luna-Fineman, S. (PI) ; Magnus, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, Y. (PI) ; Manning, M. (PI) ; Marina, N. (PI) ; Mark, J. (PI) ; Marsden, A. (PI) ; McCarty, J. (PI) ; McGhee, S. (PI) ; McNamara, N. (PI) ; Mellins, E. (PI) ; Mendoza, F. (PI) ; Milla, C. (PI) ; Misra, S. (PI) ; Moss, R. (PI) ; Murphy, D. (PI) ; Murphy, J. (PI) ; Nadeau, K. (PI) ; Narla, A. (PI) ; Neely, E. (PI) ; O'Brodovich, H. (PI) ; Oghalai, J. (PI) ; Olson, I. (PI) ; Pageler, N. (PI) ; Park, K. (PI) ; Peng, L. (PI) ; Penn, A. (PI) ; Perry, S. (PI) ; Pertofsky, C. (PI) ; Phibbs, C. (PI) ; Pico, E. (PI) ; Pizzo, P. (PI) ; Porteus, M. (PI) ; Potter, D. (PI) ; Prober, C. (PI) ; Profit, J. (PI) ; Punn, R. (PI) ; Rabinovitch, M. (PI) ; Ragavan, N. (PI) ; Rangaswami, A. (PI) ; Reddy, S. (PI) ; Rhine, W. (PI) ; Robinson, T. (PI) ; Robinson, T. (PI) ; Rodriguez, E. (PI) ; Roncarolo, M. (PI) ; Rosenthal, D. (PI) ; Roth, S. (PI) ; Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI) ; Sage, J. (PI) ; Sakamoto, K. (PI) ; Sandborg, C. (PI) ; Sanders, L. (PI) ; Sarwal, M. (PI) ; Schrijver, I. (PI) ; Schroeder, A. (PI) ; Seidel, F. (PI) ; Shah, A. (PI) ; Sharek, P. (PI) ; Shaw, G. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Shepard, E. (PI) ; Shin, A. (PI) ; Sibley, E. (PI) ; Sivakumar, D. (PI) ; Smith, A. (PI) ; Song, D. (PI) ; Sourkes, B. (PI) ; Spunt, S. (PI) ; Stevenson, D. (PI) ; Stirling, J. (PI) ; Stuart, A. (PI) ; Sutherland, S. (PI) ; Sweet-Cordero (PI) ; Tacy, T. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Tierney, S. (PI) ; Twist, C. (PI) ; Van Meurs, K. (PI) ; Wall, D. (PI) ; Wang, C. (PI) ; Weinberg, K. (PI) ; Willert, J. (PI) ; Wilson, D. (PI) ; Wiryawan, B. (PI) ; Wise, P. (PI) ; Wong, C. (PI) ; Wright, G. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Wusthoff, C. (PI) ; Yen, S. (PI) ; Yuan, N. (PI) ; Contag, C. (SI)

PEDS 202B: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as MED 200B) Second quarter of a two-quarter course provides hands-on experience summarizing qualitative data and describing findings for dissemination. Final course product will be a draft manuscript for submission with students listed as co-authors. Core topics include: identifying themes and representative quotes, community-engaged dissemination, abstract submission, posters, oral presentations, manuscript writing, and journal selection. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PEDS 202A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 206: Exploring Happiness and Health (PEDS 106)

Evidence-based research findings, theoretical concepts and applied experiences related to emotional well-being, and physical and mental health. Topics include basic cognitive neuroscience and psychological research in pro-social emotions, such as gratitude, compassion, forgiveness and mindfulness practice. Course offers lecture, readings, and applied practices that enhance mental health, resiliency and well-being. Emphasis on issues relevant to high-achieving young adults.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 214: Introduction to Pediatrics Lecture Series

Introduction to the various aspects of pediatrics, directed at pre-clinical MD students, undergraduates, or graduate students. Course composed of interactive lectures conducted by pediatric faculty on subjects ranging from normal development to topics in different pediatric subspecialties. current issues in the field, and opportunities for students considering this specialty. Speakers also touch on their career paths and choices and are available to answer questions about their areas of interest. By special arrangement students may have the opportunity to shadow general pediatricians or pediatric specialists. Intended to stimulate interest in pediatrics and to inform students about the breadth of the field.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, R. (PI)

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 224: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 226: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, HISTORY 326E)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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