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1 - 10 of 32 results for: LINGUIST

LINGUIST 30N: Linguistic Meaning and the Law

We will investigate how inherent properties of language, such as ambiguity, vagueness and context-dependence, play into the meaning of a legal text, and how the meaning of a law can remain invariant while its range of application can change with the facts and with our discovery of what the facts are. Our focus will be on the perspective linguistic analysis brings to legal theory, addressing current controversies surrounding different conceptions of `textualism¿ and drawing on well-known examples of legal reasoning about language in cases of identity fraud, obstruction of justice and genocide.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 83Q: Translation

Preference to Sophomores. What is a translation? The increased need for translations in the modern world due to factors such as tourism and terrorism, localization and globalization, diplomacy and treaties, law and religion, and literature and science. How to meet this need; different kinds of translation for different purposes; what makes one translation better than another; why some texts are more difficult to translate than others. Can some of this work be done by machines? Are there things that cannot be said in some languages?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

Phonetics is the systematic study of speech. In this class, we will learn about the physical gestures and timing involved in the articulation of spoken language and about the resulting acoustic signal that is decoded into linguistic units by the human auditory system. The class is structured into two parts: A practical lab component, and a class component. This course highlights both the complexity of the physical nature of producing spoken language, and the highly variable acoustic signal that is interpreted by listeners as language. By the end of this course, you should: (1) Understand the process of preparing an utterance to articulating it; (2) Understand the basic acoustic properties of speech; (3) Provide detailed phonetic transcriptions of speech; (4) Produce and understand the gestures involved in nearly all of the world's speech sounds, and (5) Understand the ways this knowledge can be used to advance our understanding of spoken language understanding by humans and machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include logical semantics, conversational implicature, presupposition, and speech acts. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as  PHIL 150  or 151, should attend section. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 152: Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies (LINGUIST 252)

Introduction to pidgins and creoles, organized around the main stages in the pidgin-creole life cycle: pidginization, creolization, and decreolization. Focus is on transformations in the English language as it was transported from Britain to Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. Resultant pidginized and creolized varieties such as Nigerian Pidgin English, Chinese Pidgin English, New Guinea Tok Pisin, Suriname Sranan, and the creole continua of Guyana, Jamaica, and Hawaii. Also French, Dutch, Portugese, Chinook, Motu, and Sango.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rickford, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 157: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 257)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, social networks. Methods include: string algorithms, edit distance, language modeling, the noisy channel, machine learning classifiers, inverted indices, collaborative filtering, neural embeddings, PageRank. Applications such as question answering, sentiment analysis, information retrieval, text classification, social network models, spell checking, recommender systems, chatbots. Prerequisites: CS103, CS107, CS109.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 191: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 291)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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