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1 - 10 of 125 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 7D: Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery, 1500 to 1900 (AFRICAAM 107D, HISTORY 107D)

Between 1500 and 1900, about 12 million people were forcibly removed from Africa and transported to the Americas to work as slaves. This course explores the history of racial slavery in the Atlantic world and its lasting significance. Topics include the Middle Passage, the development of racism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, resistance, African-American cultures, abolitionism, the process of emancipation, reparations, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 7S: Stanford Collects: A History of Collecting (ARTHIST 278S)

Leland Stanford, Jr. was a curator extraordinaire. His collecting shaped Stanford into a university, an archive, a library, and a museum. Students will explore Stanford's campus collections to discover how objects and artifacts tell the history not only of the university, but also Palo Alto, California, and the American West writ large. The course is hosted in Green Library and features visits to the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University Archaeology Collections, and more. All majors welcome. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Toledano, A. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 14N: Making the Middle Ages

Through hands-on engagement with Stanford¿s diverse collections of medieval artifacts-- from grungy coins to lavish manuscripts-- this course offers an introduction to the cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean world from 400-1400 CE. In addition, the course will explore competing contemporary understandings of the "Middle Ages" and the role of the "medieval" in shaping what it means to be "modern".
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 16: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 116)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 22S: From 'superfluous women' to the 'Yolocaust': The Experience of War in 20th Century Europe

Through a variety of primary sources, including diaries, photographs, letters, and artifacts this course explores the multiplicity of ways in which Europeans experienced the great conflicts that swept the continent in the 20th century. The unprecedented impact of these wars will be traced in stories of those whose voices have been marginalized in conventional historiography. This course encourages and guides students in their first forays into archival work in a hands-on approach to developing ways of thinking historically.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Szymkow, B. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)
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