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1 - 10 of 18 results for: FRENCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FRENCH 87N: The New Wave: How The French Reinvented Cinema

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabrol's Les Cousins or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Taught in English. NOTE: Class meets Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:20pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 121: Jean-Jacques Rousseau: Politics, Philosophy, and Literature

"Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains." This seminar explores the work of one of the most important and enigmatic thinkers about the problems of modern society: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Students will read a selection of his most important works in dialogue with other important thinkers of his time. They will grapple with Rousseau's political philosophy in his critique of modernity and his vision for remaking politics, as well as his moral philosophy and influential fictional visions of education and love. We will discuss not only Rousseau's landmark contributions to debates about authenticity, transparency, and self-interest, but also his troubling views on gender. The class will conclude with Rousseau's autobiography and its profound meditation on the formation of selfhood. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

FRENCH 130: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

Gender, race and religion are at the heart of our contemporary political and societal debates. How to build a nation and how to live together within it were also the key questions that medieval and Renaissance authors asked. Throughout this introductory course, we will study how canonical literary works from the 11th to the 16th century represented the conflicting debates of their times around these notions, from the Crusades to the Wars of Religion, from courtly love to Petrarchism, and from the figure of the Wandering Knight to the one of the Sea Farer. Were women inferior to men because their bodies were colder? What does a Christian superhero look like? Is Man at the center of God¿s creation? Are Catholics cannibals, or are Protestants heretics? Can the French language ever be as good as Ancient Greek? Are printed books dangerous? These are some questions that will be addressed in a multi-genre corpus, including works from Pisan, De France, Ronsard, Labé, Rabelais, and Montaigne. S more »
Gender, race and religion are at the heart of our contemporary political and societal debates. How to build a nation and how to live together within it were also the key questions that medieval and Renaissance authors asked. Throughout this introductory course, we will study how canonical literary works from the 11th to the 16th century represented the conflicting debates of their times around these notions, from the Crusades to the Wars of Religion, from courtly love to Petrarchism, and from the figure of the Wandering Knight to the one of the Sea Farer. Were women inferior to men because their bodies were colder? What does a Christian superhero look like? Is Man at the center of God¿s creation? Are Catholics cannibals, or are Protestants heretics? Can the French language ever be as good as Ancient Greek? Are printed books dangerous? These are some questions that will be addressed in a multi-genre corpus, including works from Pisan, De France, Ronsard, Labé, Rabelais, and Montaigne. Students will gain an acute sense of the main cultural, political, ideological and literary issues of this extended time period, while acquiring some historical perspective on the debates that are central to our 21st century societies. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Tresfels, C. (PI)

FRENCH 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 199: Individual Work

Restricted to French majors with consent of department. Normally limited to 4-unit credit toward the major. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 207: How to Build an Empire: Race and Religion in Imperial France (FRENCH 307, HISTORY 230G)

This class will explore the French Empire through race and religion, and examine its specificity vis-a-vis the history of other European empires. How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, Republic and empire? This course will draw from literary, political, philosophical and anthropological texts to introduce students to key notions and concepts debated in France and the francophone world. Readings bear on the nature of nation and citizenship, the tension between republic and empire, the dynamics of universalism and particularism, changing discourses of race, and the role of religion in the nation-state.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 236: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (CSRE 140S, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C, URBANST 140F)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. We will look at the historical development shaping their respective architecture and why they became the three major urban centers in North Africa. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial past, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENCH 244: The Enlightenment (DLCL 324, HISTORY 234, HISTORY 334, HISTORY 432A, HUMNTIES 324)

The Enlightenment as a philosophical, literary, and political movement. Themes include the nature and limits of philosophy, the grounds for critical intellectual engagement, the institution of society and the public, and freedom, equality and human progress. Authors include Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Diderot, and Condorcet.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 247: Islam and the Western Imagination (FRENCH 347, HISTORY 230J)

With fear of Islamic terrorism running high and restrictive immigration policies at home, it is more urgent than ever to understand the complex and changing relations between Islam and the West, the West and Islam. Using France's history and culture as a main study case, along with other Western contexts, this course will look at the long history of Europe's interactions with the Muslim world, as well as the presence of Islam and Muslims in the West, from the 7th century to the present day. Uncovering the long and complex relationship between France and Islam, historical, literary and media sources will help us explore early Christian myths about Islam, the period of European coexistence, European colonialism in North Africa and the Middle East, the place of feminism in Western-Muslim relations, (post)colonial immigration and finally, a post-9/11 world order characterized by new forms of Islamophobia. In the context of the course, students will be exposed to primary sources including audiovisual materials, literature, manifestos, and theory. Readings will be in English (and optional readings in French for students who would prefer to read in French).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Marcus, E. (PI)

FRENCH 279: How the French Reinvented Cinema: The New Wave (FRENCH 379)

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabrol's The Cousins or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Graduate and Junior/Senior level. Taught in English. NOTE: Class meets Thursday 1:30-4:20pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:30pm
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)
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