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1 - 10 of 40 results for: ENGR ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 15: Dynamics

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 21: Engineering of Systems

A high-level look at techniques for analyzing and designing complex, multidisciplinary engineering systems, such as aircraft, spacecraft, automobiles, power plants, cellphones, robots, biomedical devices, and many others. The need for multi-level design, modeling and simulation approaches, computation-based design, and hardware and software-in-the-loop simulations will be demonstrated through a variety of examples and case studies. Several aspects of system engineering will be applied to the design of large-scale interacting systems and contrasted with subsystems such as hydraulic systems, electrical systems, and brake systems. The use of design-thinking, story-boarding, mockups, sensitivity analysis, simulation, team-based design, and the development of presentation skills will be fostered through several realistic examples in several fields of engineering.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 25E: Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use (CHEMENG 25E)

An introduction and overview to the challenges and opportunities of energy supply and consumption. Emphasis on energy technologies where chemistry and engineering play key roles. Review of energy fundamentals along with historical energy perspectives and current energy production technologies. In depth analysises of solar thermal systems, biofuels, photovoltaics and electrochemical devices (batteries and fuel cells). Prerequisites: high school chemistry or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 40A: Introductory Electronics

First portion of the former ENGR 40, for students not pursuing degree in Electrical Engineering. Instruction to be completed in the first seven weeks of the quarter. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B. Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Lab. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 300.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40B: Introductory Electronics Part II

Second portion of the former ENGR 40. Instruction to be completed in the final three weeks of the quarter. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B. Students cannot enroll in ENGR 40B without enrolling in ENGR 40A. Students choose one the following sections (1) Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. (2) Digital hardware and software implementations of a robot car. Lab. Lab assignments. Co-requisite: ENGR 40A. Enrollment limited to 300.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 42: Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications (EE 42)

Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 50M: Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 60: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (CEE 146S)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

ENGR 62X: Introduction to Optimization (Accelerated) (MS&E 111X, MS&E 211X)

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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