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1 - 10 of 89 results for: CS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. The time listed on AXESS is for the first week's logistical meeting only. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 20: Tensorflow for Deep Learning Research

This course will cover the fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Tensorflow library for deep learning research. Through the course, students will use Tensorflow to build models of different complexity, from simple linear/logistic regression to convolutional neural network and recurrent neural networks with LSTM to solve tasks such as word embeddings, translation, optical character recognition. Students will also learn best practices to structure a model and manage research experiments. Prerequisites: CS229 or CS224D/N.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Manning, C. (PI)

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (IPS 200)

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 42: Callback Me Maybe: Contemporary Javascript

Introduction to the JavaScript programming language with a focus on building contemporary applications. Course consists of in-class activities and programming assignments that challenge students to create functional web apps (e.g. Yelp, Piazza, Instagram). Topics include syntax/semantics, event-based programming, document object model (DOM), application programming interfaces (APIs), asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX), jQuery, Node.js, and MongoDB. Prerequisite: CS 107.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 43: Functional Programming in Clojure

Clojure is a dialect of Lisp that runs on the JVM, CLR, or Javascript engine. This course explores the fundamentals and philosophy of Clojure, with emphasis on the benefits of immutability and functional programming that make it such a powerful and fun language. Topics include: immutability, functional programming (function composition, higher order functions), concurrency (atoms, promises, futures, actors, Software Transactional Memory, etc), LISP (REPL-driven development, homoiconicity, macros), and interop (between Clojure code and code native to the host VM). The course also explores design paradigms and looks at the differences between functional programing and object-oriented programing, as well as bottom-up versus top-down design.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 47SI: Cross-Platform Mobile Development

The fundamentals of cross-platform mobile application development using the React Native framework (RN). Primary focus on developing best practices in creating apps for both iOS and Android by using Javascript and existing web + mobile development paradigms. Students will explore the unique aspects that made RN a primary tool for mobile development within Facebook, Instagram, Airbnb, Walmart, Tesla, and UberEats. Skills developed over the course will be consolidated by the completion of a final project. Required Prerequisites ¿ at least one of the following: CS142, CS193P, CS193A (Web/Mobile development or heavy project-based class experience). Apply here: https://goo.gl/forms/sF3TDYd5mN7V8f1W2 by January 13th (Saturday of week one)
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience launching and developing your own social impact projects! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Along with support, resources, and community discussion, the class provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while providing students with experience engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. Prerequisite: CS 147, equivalent experience, or consent of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 83: Playback Theater For Research

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are alwaysnmoving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back.nThere is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required. Apply here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1gR4bGkFZh_ycMBGMz1AIIuyv7WyQfX5xTjanGlclK-A/prefill
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 103: Mathematical Foundations of Computing

Mathematical foundations required for computer science, including propositional predicate logic, induction, sets, functions, and relations. Formal language theory, including regular expressions, grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, and NP-completeness. Mathematical rigor, proof techniques, and applications. Prerequisite: CS106B or equivalent. CS106B may be taken concurrently with CS103.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 103A: Mathematical Problem-solving Strategies

Problem solving strategies and techniques in discrete mathematics and computer science. Additional problem solving practice for CS103. In-class participation required. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Co-requisite: CS103.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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