2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 22 results for: CHINA ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHINA 20Q: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (HUMCORE 20Q, JAPAN 20Q, KOREA 20Q)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and more »
This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 105: Beginning Classical Chinese, First Quarter (CHINA 205)

The goal is develop students' reading knowledge of classical Chinese, including basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students will also learn concepts and ideas fundamental in Chinese culture involving family, human relationships, governance, learning, life/death, philosophy, etc. through reading canonical classical Chinese texts. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 23 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sun, C. (PI)

CHINA 111: Literature in 20th-Century China (CHINA 211)

(Graduate students register for 211.) How modern Chinese culture evolved from tradition to modernity; the century-long drive to build a modern nation state and to carry out social movements and political reforms. How the individual developed modern notions of love, affection, beauty, and moral relations with community and family. Sources include fiction and film clips. WIM course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wang, B. (PI)

CHINA 154Q: Utopia/Dystopia in Chinese Literature and Culture

What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous uto more »
What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous utopian traditions, early modern speculative fiction written under the influence of modern ideologies ranging from nationalism, Social Darwinism to Marxism, as well as contemporary science fiction by writers such as the Hugo Award-winning Liu Cixin and Hao Jingfang. As we analyze the desires, hopes, and fears that manifest themselves in these Chinese alternative realities, we will also think about questions that concern all of us as human beings: who are we and how do we want to live with one another?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zhou, C. (PI)

CHINA 163: Chinese Biographies of Women (CHINA 263)

Generic and historical analysis of the two-millennia long biographical tradition inaugurated by Liu Xiang, ca. 79-8 B.C.E. Chinese women's history, intellectual history, historiography, and literary studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 175: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 135, ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 275)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

CHINA 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to do research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for one quarter. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit

CHINA 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC seniors or juniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 199: Individual Reading in Chinese

Asian Language majors only. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 103 or consent of instructor. Units by arrangement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHINA 200: Directed Reading in Chinese

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints