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1 - 10 of 19 results for: AA ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 118N: How to Design a Space Mission: from Concept to Execution

Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to th more »
Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to their integration and validation. We will compare the current designs with those employed in the early days of the space age, and show the importance of economics in the development of spacecraft. Finally, we will brainstorm startup ideas and apply the concepts learned to a notional space mission design as a team.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: D'Amico, S. (PI)

AA 119N: 3D Printed Aerospace Structures

The demand for rapid prototyping of lightweight, complex, and low-cost structures has led the aerospace industry to leverage three-dimensional (3D) printing as a manufacturing technology. For example, the manufacture of aircraft engine components, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) wings, CubeSat parts, and satellite sub-systems have recently been realized with 3D printing and other additive manufacturing techniques. In this freshman seminar, a survey of state-of-the-art 3D printing processes will be reviewed and the process-dependent properties of 3D-printed materials and structures will be analyzed in detail. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of this manufacturing approach will be debated during class! To give students exposure to 3D printing systems in action, tours of actual 3D printing facilities on campus (Stanford's Product Realization Laboratory), as well as in Silicon Valley (e.g., Made in Space) will be conducted.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Senesky, D. (PI)

AA 190: Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro

For undergraduates. Experimental or theoretical work under faculty direction, and emphasizing development of research and communication skills. Written report(s) and letter grade required; if this is not appropriate, enroll in 199. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics, involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of student services manager and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 199: Independent Study in Aero/Astro

Directed reading, lab, or theoretical work for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the graduate research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 212: Advanced Feedback Control Design

Analysis and design techniques for multivariable feedback systems. State-space concepts, observability, controllability, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, stability, and canonical representations. Approaches for robust feedback control design, chiefly H2, H-infinity, and mu-synthesis. System identification and adaptive control design. Use of computer-aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: ENGR 105, ENGR 205. Recommended: Linear algebra ( EE 263 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Schwager, M. (PI)

AA 214A: Numerical Methods in Engineering and Applied Sciences (CME 207, GEOPHYS 217)

Scientific computing and numerical analysis for physical sciences and engineering. Advanced version of CME206 that, apart from CME206 material, includes nonlinear PDEs, multidimensional interpolation and integration and an extended discussion of stability for initial boundary value problems. Recommended for students who have some prior numerical analysis experience. Topics include: 1D and multi-D interpolation, numerical integration in 1D and multi-D including adaptive quadrature, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including stability, numerical solutions of 1D and multi-D linear and nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) including concepts of stability and accuracy. Prerequisites: linear algebra, introductory numerical analysis ( CME 108 or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Suckale, J. (PI)

AA 228: Decision Making under Uncertainty (CS 238)

This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation for why uncertainty matters, particularly for aerospace applications. Introduces decision making under uncertainty from a computational perspective and provides an overview of the necessary tools for building autonomous and decision-support systems. Following an introduction to probabilistic models and decision theory, the course will cover computational methods for solving decision problems with stochastic dynamics, model uncertainty, and imperfect state information. Topics include: Bayesian networks, influence diagrams, dynamic programming, reinforcement learning, and partially observable Markov decision processes. Applications cover: air traffic control, aviation surveillance systems, autonomous vehicles, and robotic planetary exploration. Prerequisites: basic probability and fluency in a high-level programming language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 236A: Spacecraft Design

The design of unmanned spacecraft and spacecraft subsystems emphasizing identification of design drivers and current design methods. Topics: spacecraft configuration design, mechanical design, structure and thermal subsystem design, attitude control, electric power, command and telemetry, and design integration and operations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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