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POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the power of the purse. About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress's contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cox, G. (PI)

POLISCI 27N: Thinking Like a Social Scientist

Preference to freshman. This seminar will consider how politics and government can be studied systematically: the compound term Political SCIENCE is not an oxymoron. The seminar will introduce core concepts and explore a variety of methodological approaches. Problems of inference from evidence will be a major concern. Classic and contemporary research studies will be the basis of discussion throughout.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 28N: The Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics

Almost one-third of Americans now identify with a racial/ethnic minority group. This seminar examines the relationship between racial identity, group consciousness, and public opinion. Topics include the role of government institutions in shaping identification, challenges in defining and measuring race, attitudes towards race-based policies, and the development of political solidarity within racial groups. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of political identities among the growing mixed-race population.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 29N: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 52N, ENGLISH 52N)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 31Q: Justice and the City

Cities have most often been where struggles for social justice happen, where injustice is most glaring and where new or renewed visions of just communities are developed and tested. What makes a city just or unjust? How have people tried to make cities more just? Why have these efforts succeeded or failed? Each of our sessions will focus on questions like these and include a case study of a particular city, largely with a focus on the United States, including very local cases like San Francisco, Palo Alto and East Palo Alto. The central goal of this class is for you to gain an understanding of the roles of urban design and urban policies in making cities just or unjust places. You will critically engage with some of the debates on cities and justice and gain experience connecting theoretical debates about justice and democracy to empirical data and contemporary work on city design, planning, and policies through readings, our class discussions, and a sustained research project looking a particular city in depth.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 43Q: Immigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe

Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries r more »
Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries respond so differently than others in similar circumstances? When does the meaning of citizenship evolve and when does it stay the same? What lessons do other countries have for the United States as it considers immigration reform? n n This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the United States and other countries, particularly in the European Union. Students will develop the necessary tools to critically analyze immigration policies, starting with the historical evolution of immigration policy in the United States. We will visit Angel Island and discuss the legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act as well as contemporary immigration politics in San Francisco, a so-called ¿sanctuary city¿ for undocumented immigrants. There will also be a screening on La Haine (Hate), an acclaimed French film which chronicles the challenges of immigrant integration. Students will study the economics of immigration and the politics of refugees in the context of post-9/11 security dilemmas. Students will design a concrete immigration policy proposal.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 49N: Dictators

This course explores how dictators perpetuate their rule through the use of ideology, coercion and political institutions. We will examine existing typologies of authoritarian rule and investigate examples of dictatorship from across the world, both contemporary and historical. Using works of fiction in addition to historical and political science texts, we will consider why some people resist authoritarian rule while others do not and the conditions under which dictators are overthrown.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, terrorism, economic policy, and development.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (INTNLREL 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 102: Politics and Public Policy (AMSTUD 123X, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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