2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

491 - 500 of 872 results for: all courses

HISTORY 283: Middle East Oil and Global Economy (HISTORY 383)

The class studies Middle East oil in the global economy using the method of political economy. Topics addressed include: origins of the Middle East oil industry; the Seven Sisters international oil cartel; Aramco and the U.S.-Saudi alliance; the post-World War II petroleum order; petroleum, the crisis of 1971-82, and the rise of a new regime of capital accumulation regulated neo-liberal economic orthodoxy and "Washington Consensus" policies- commonly referred to as "globalization" since the 1990s.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 286: Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times (HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 286, JEWISHST 386)

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 287C: Zionism and its Critics

Zionism from its genesis in the 1880s up until the establishment of the state of Israel in May, 1948, exploring the historical, ideological and political dimensions of Zionism. Topics include: the emergence of Zionist ideology in connection to and as a response to challenges of modernity; emancipation; Haskalah (Jewish enlightenment); other national and ideological movements of the period; the ideological crystallization of the movement; and the immigration waves to Palestine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 290: North Korea in Historical Perspective (HISTORY 390)

This colloquium will approach North Korea from a longer historical perspective and also discuss the country's current crisis and its future. Themes will include the northern region in colonial Korea, Kim Il Sung and Manchurian guerrillas, the USSR and North Korean Revolution, the reconstruction after the Korean War, Juche ideology and the political system, the everyday life of North Korea people, the Cold War and North Korean diplomacy, culture and mass performance, the great famine and economy in transition, the military and nuclear development, and refugees and the succession of leadership.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 291J: East Asian Environmental History (HISTORY 391J)

Traversing 2,500 years of history, this colloquium begins with conceptions of nature, agricultural time, and agriculture in ancient East Asia, proceeds to look closely at the environmental history of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, and then concludes with environmental issues in East Asia from a contemporary perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brown, T. (PI)

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 292J: Sino-Korean Relations, Past and Present (CHINA 156, CHINA 256, KOREA 156, KOREA 256)

Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with more »
Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with diverse interpretations of the past and to consider how a common history is interpreted by different audiences and for different purposes. What are the implications of divergent memories of a single historical event for Chinese and Korean political, cultural, and ethnic identities? How are political, cultural, and ethnic identities constructed through engagement with difference? And what is at stake in different constructions of identity?In addressing these issues, students will also engage in social inquiry. They will be asked to understand how political ideology, economic organization, and social forces have shaped the character of Sino-Korean relations. What are the economic and political institutions that influence these relations in each time period? How do ideologies like Confucianism, Communism, or free-market liberalism interface with Chinese and Korean societies and impact their relations?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 294C: First Encounters: China and the West, 1500-1860 (HISTORY 394C)

For four hundred years, the peoples of China and the West have engaged with each other. What happened when worlds and world-views came into contact? In this course, we will explore the experience of encounter and its cultural impact on two largely distinct, but never isolated societies. We will study the history of cross-cultural exchange between China and the West to see how each emerged through dialogue with the other and to understand the roots of our own interconnected world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Statman, A. (PI)

HISTORY 296C: The Making of Modern India (HISTORY 396C)

What does the history of the modern world look like as seen through India's history? Through an examination of ancient India and the development of Hindu and Buddhist communities, to the influx of Muslims and the rise of the Mughal Empire, to European colonialism, Gandhi and anti-colonial movements, to Partition, Independence, Bollywood, and the rise of Hindu nationalist political parties, this course will provide a fresh lens to not only view India's history, but India's role in shaping the modern world.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Perkins, C. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints