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471 - 480 of 872 results for: all courses

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 252C: The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery (AFRICAAM 252C, CSRE 252C)

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 252E: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 254G: The Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution

Why did Britain's North American colonies declare independence from an empire they had long revered? What did the American Revolution mean for the people who experienced it? In this course we will explore the explosive origins of the American republic. Topics: revolutionary ideology, empire, the federal constitution, slavery, social conflict, and the international consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 256E: The American Civil War (AFRICAAM 256E, AMSTUD 256E)

What was it like to live in the United States during the Civil War? This course uses the lenses of racial/ethnic identity, gender, class, and geography (among others) to explore the breadth of human experience during this singular moment in American history. It illuminates the varied ways in which Americans, in the Union states and the Confederate states, struggled to move forward and to find meaning in the face of unprecedented division and destruction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hammann, A. (PI)

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

HISTORY 257: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 357)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 259E: American Interventions, 1898-Present (HISTORY 359E, INTNLREL 168A)

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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