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HISTORY 3F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 103F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 4: Introduction to Geospatial Humanities (HISTORY 104)

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial humanities, understood broadly as the application of GIS techniques and other quantitative methods in the humanistic study of social and cultural patterns in past and present settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 7D: Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery, 1500 to 1900 (AFRICAAM 107D, HISTORY 107D)

Between 1500 and 1900, about 12 million people were forcibly removed from Africa and transported to the Americas to work as slaves. This course explores the history of racial slavery in the Atlantic world and its lasting significance. Topics include the Middle Passage, the development of racism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, resistance, African-American cultures, abolitionism, the process of emancipation, reparations, and the perpetuation of slavery and other forms of unfree labor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 7G: Making Anglo-American Capitalism (HISTORY 107G)

This course addresses capitalism in global perspective to identify the roots of our current economic system. We will consider theories about capitalism, the politics and policies of implementation, and the human and environmental consequences through topics such as the imperial political economy, consumerism, plantation economies, the East India Company, and the rise of credit. Embedding markets in a range of social relations, cultural practices, and institutional arrangements, reveals how capital became an -ism in specific and knowable historical circumstances.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 7S: Stanford Collects: A History of Collecting (ARTHIST 278S)

Leland Stanford, Jr. was a curator extraordinaire. His collecting shaped Stanford into a university, an archive, a library, and a museum. Students will explore Stanford's campus collections to discover how objects and artifacts tell the history not only of the university, but also Palo Alto, California, and the American West writ large. The course is hosted in Green Library and features visits to the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University Archaeology Collections, and more. All majors welcome. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Toledano, A. (PI)

HISTORY 8C: Sugar and Slavery, Race and Revolution: The Caribbean 1450-1888 (AFRICAAM 18C, CSRE 108C, HISTORY 108C)

This course examines race and slavery across British, French, and Spanish islands, plus Brazil. The intensity of Caribbean slavery produced societies where more people were enslaved than free. The idea of "black" was invented and contested as Caribbean inhabitants leaned on African roots to shape new cultures. Sugar production sparked global wars and planted the seed of modern financial systems. Black people fought back, in ways large and small, marking the beginning of emancipation with the Haitian Revolution.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mitchell, D. (PI)

HISTORY 9S: Censorship & Propaganda: From Renaissance to Revolution (DLCL 106)

Information is power. From the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries, a shadowy world of illicit communication challenged church and state. We'll explore the resulting communication wars as waged through print, art, architecture, and theatre. We'll read banned, scandalous and satirical works by Niccolò Machiavelli, Martin Luther and Benjamin Franklin among many others. From the archives to the digital humanities, students will gain new tools to explore the politics and historical development of information control.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Midura, R. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Renaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)
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