2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

271 - 280 of 859 results for: all courses

ECON 166: International Trade

Explaining patterns of trade among nations; characterizing the sources of comparative advantage in production and the prospect of gains from economies of scale. Enumerating and accounting for the net aggregate gains from trade, and identifying winners and losers from globalization. Analyzing the effects of international labor migration, foreign direct investment, outsourcing, and multinational companies. Strategic trade policy; international trade agreements; labor and environmental implications. We will review relevant theoretical frameworks, examine empirical evidence, and discuss historical and contemporary policy debates as covered in the popular press; active class participation is an important part of the course. Prerequisite: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 179: Experimental Economics

Methods and major subject areas that have been addressed by laboratory experiments. Focus is on a series of experiments that build on one another. Topics include decision making, two player games, auctions, and market institutions. How experiments are used to learn about preferences and behavior, trust, fairness, and learning. Final presentation of group projects. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 102A.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 180: Honors Game Theory

Rigorous introduction to game theory and applications. Topics include solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, signaling games, repeated games, bargaining, and elements of cooperative game theory. Applications mainly from economics, but also political science, biology, and computer science. Prerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No background in economics required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Segal, I. (PI)

EDUC 114N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, CSRE 14N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 117N: Losing My Religion: Secularism and Spirituality in American Lives (AMSTUD 117N, RELIGST 13N)

In this seminar you will explore theory and practice, sociological data, spiritual writing, and case studies in an effort to gain a more nuanced understanding about how religion, spirituality, and secularism attempt to make legible the constellation of concerns, commitments, and behaviors that bridge the moral and the personal, the communal and the national, the sacred, the profane, and the rational. Together we will cultivate critical perspectives on practices and politics, beliefs and belonging that we typically take for granted.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2018 | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

EDUC 122Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (HISTORY 52Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ehrlich, T. (PI)

EDUC 149: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 249)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 151: The Future of Information (STS 151)

As information has a fascinating history (see HISTORY 5A), so it possesses a promising if concerning future. Through lecture, demonstration, online modules, and in-class web-work, this course will provide students with advanced strategies in (a) identifying sources and tools for advancing the quest for information; (b) assessing elements of trust, authority, and chicanery in the provision of information; (c) recognizing the economic and legal structures shaping information sources, services, and rights; and (d) discovering who is behind what information. With a focus on the info-worlds of journalism, learning, governance, students will acquire and practice the forensic skills and web savvy of fact-checkers and investigative reporters, activists and scholars. Here's a class set to determine the future course of information. The class will be a hybrid course, combining in-class delivery of materials, with a number of classes involving students taking online modules (at their convenience) that are designed to teach information literacy skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints