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31 - 40 of 102 results for: all courses

EE 141: Engineering Electromagnetics

Lumped versus distributed circuits. Transient response of transmission lines with resistive and reactive loads. Reflection, transmission, attenuation and dispersion. Steady-state waves on transmission lines. Standing wave ratio, impedance matching, and power flow. Coulomb's law, electrostatic field, potential and gradient, electric flux and Gauss's Law and divergence. Metallic conductors, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, capacitance, dielectric materials. Electrostatic energy and forces. Steady electric currents, Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's Laws, charge conservation and the continuity equation, Joule's Law. Biot-Savart's law and the static magnetic field. Ampere's Law and curl. Vector magnetic potential and magnetic dipole. Magnetic materials, forces and torques. Faraday's Law, magnetic energy, displacement current and Maxwell's equations. Uniform plane waves. Prerequisites: 102A, MATH 52.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vuckovic, J. (PI)

ENERGY 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENGR 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 40C: Engineering Wireless Networks

A hands on introduction to the design and implementation of modern wireless networks. Via a quarter long project on programmable radios, students will learn the fundamentals of wireless channels, encoding and decoding information, modeling of errors and error recovery algorithms, and the engineering of packet-switched networks. These concepts will be used to illustrate general themes in EE and CS: the role of abstraction and modularity in engineering design, building reliable systems using imperfect components, understanding the limits imposed by energy and noise, choosing effective representations for information, and engineering tradeoffs in complex systems. Formerly ENGR40N.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katti, S. (PI)

ENGR 40P: Physics of Electrical Engineering (EE 41)

How everything from electrostatics to quantum mechanics is used in common high-technology products. Electrostatics are critical in micro-mechanical systems used in many sensors and displays, and Electromagnetic waves are essential in all high-speed communication systems. How to propagate energy on transmission lines, optical fibers,and in free space. Which aspects of modern physics are needed to generate light for the operation of a DVD player or TV. Introduction to semiconductors, solid-state light bulbs, and laser pointers. Hands-on labs to connect physics to everyday experience. Prerequisites: Physics 43
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Solgaard, O. (PI)

ENGR 70A: Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited and requires an application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70B: Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited; application required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) (CS 106X)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (BIOE 80)

Broad but rigorous overview of the field of bioengineering, centered around the common theme of engineering analysis and design of biological systems. Topics include biomechanics, systems and synthetic biology, physical biology, biomolecular engineering, tissue engineering, and devices. Emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving approaches, and quantitative methods applied to biology. 4 units, Spr (Cochran)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENERGY 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 154: Vector Calculus for Engineers (CME 100)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green's, divergence, and Stokes' theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: MATH 41 and 42, or 10 units AP credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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