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SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 112: Outside In: Arts Organizations and the Changing Cultural Audience

Study the major disruptions in how audiences define, seek out, participate in, and share cultural experiences. Research¿based theory with practice, case studies and hands¿on assignments. Analyze newly emerging cultural consumers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, A. (PI)

SINY 116: Off the iPhone and Into the City: Creating a Photography Project

Learn components of photography projects and image making including content selection, intention, context, and audience. Talks by professional photographers; field trips to in the city. Two response papers about an exhibition, publication, or long-form web project during their time in New York.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

SINY 122: The Agile City

Examine the economic, cultural and environmental forces transforming the urban experience globally and understand how cities become agile to adapt to rapidly evolving urban challenges. This course would draw from case studies in New York and elsewhere, using guest experts and site visits or walking tours.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SINY 124: New York and the Art World

In an influential essay of 1964 responding to the work of Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns, the philosopher Arthur Danto defined an "artworld" as "an atmosphere of artistic theory." More generally, the term art world has come to mean a social, cultural and economic network consisting of art professionals (artists, curators, collectors, gallerists/dealers, historians, educators and critics) and institutions (the media, museums, galleries, schools, auction houses and other markets, such as art fairs). Since the end of World War II and the migration of European artists associated with the School of Paris, New York has traditionally been considered the capital of the art world, a position it largely retains even as the contemporary art world is a global phenomenon. This course considers the definitions and practices associated with the New York art world through readings in history and theory and extensive on-the-ground engagement with its pivotal figures and sites. Field trips to museums, galleries and other cultural institutions showcase the wider implications and professional aspects of current art making, as well as the exhibition, distribution and reception of contemporary art. Some background in art history is helpful but not required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SINY 136: Opera at the Met: Global Art in the World's Great Metropolis

This course allows students to discover the power and beauty of live opera through masterful performances at the Metropolitan Opera House.Often viewed as an elitist art, opera has strong roots in popular culture and politics. These issues will emerge over the course of the quarter, as we experience opera at the world's premiere opera house.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rehm, R. (PI)

SINY 140: Mapping, time, space, and culture

New York, the financial and cultural capitol of the nation, provides an extraordinary laboratory for exploring the art and science of information representation. The proposed course aims to engage students in a broad swath of art and culture, contextualized by studying the sociopolitical urban landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berger, J. (PI)

SINY 146: Imaging Change: Global Arts and Social Change

This course will examine some of the people, collectives, and organizations working globally that use the realm of the visual to address and advocate for human rights and social justice. Students will learn about practitioners in socially engaged art, concerned photography, cultural organizing, public art, interactive film, and more. The class will include regular visits to (or guests from) artists¿ and photographers¿ studios, and the esteemed foundations and organizations supporting this work. A final paper will be required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jackson, D. (PI)

SIW 164: Debating the Nation

Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SIW 170: DOCUMENTARY: Films of Persuasion, Advocacy and Change

In recent years, documentaries have shed their identity as the "broccoli" of the film world - they were good for you, but not necessarily palatable. Audiences are now engaged, entertained, and enlightened by the work of Errol Morris, Laura Poitras, Michael Moore, Marshall Curry, and others. Has a documentary film ever provoked you, challenged your beliefs, motivated you to act or changed your mind about something? Was that the goal of the filmmaker? This course offers a conceptual overview of the forms, strategies, and conventions of a documentary film with a particular focus on the social and political documentary, i.e. documentaries that strive to explore issues, construct arguments about the world, and galvanize attitudinal change. A consideration of both form and content will foreground the mutable characteristics of the genre with respect to filmmaker voice and point of view, the objective/subjective conundrum, ethics of representation, aesthetic choices, and the implied contract between filmmaker and audience. Students will hone their critical viewing skills and consider the potential of film to effect attitudinal and behavioral change through a series of case studies of films that represent a wide range of styles and approach.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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