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KOREA 122: Translating Cool: Globalized Popular Culture in Asia (JAPAN 122, JAPAN 222, KOREA 222)

Did you grow up watching Pokémon and Power Rangers? Have you danced along to "Gangnam Style"? As we become increasingly exposed to Asian popular culture and the Internet facilitates instant access to new media, previous localized forms of entertainment--animated cartoons, comics, video games, music videos, film, and soap operas--have become part of a global staple. However, these cultural forms have emerged not only in their original form with mediation of subtitles. Many have undergone various processes of adaptation and translation so that we no longer recognize that these products had ever originated elsewhere. This course will immerse students in a range of Japanese and Korean cultural phenomena to reveal the spectrum of translation practices across national boundaries. We will inquire into why these cultural forms have such compelling and powerful staying power, contextualize them within their frames of production, and explore the strategies, limitations, and potential of translational practices.nnContact instructor for place. dafnazur@stanford.edunKnight 201.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LINGUIST 148: Language of Advertising

A good ad takes the language we all share and manipulates it in creative, sometimes unique ways to influence our thoughts and our behavior. This course explores the range of techniques that advertisers use to express propositions that we consumers will notice, enjoy, and accept. Because advertising is quick to pick up on new trends, tracing the changes over the past century will allow us to re-experience the huge shifts in culture and media that have happened since then. The most effective advertisers understand us really well. Their choice of words, structure, image, and sometimes sound together form a careful composition. By taking apart some great past ads, we'll indirectly be looking at ourselves, as seen by the advertiser. Many of the techniques in ads are adapted from our own normal linguistic behavior. For example, think of how you adjust your vocabulary and tone to the person you're talking to, whether a friend, a professor, or a parent. This lecture course will include weekly input from students, who will present examples to form the basis for discussion and discovery.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 163: The Greek Invention of Mathematics (CLASSICS 136)

How was mathematics invented? A survey of the main creative ideas of ancient Greek mathematics. Among the issues explored are the axiomatic system of Euclid's Elements, the origins of the calculus in Greek measurements of solids and surfaces, and Archimedes' creation of mathematical physics. We will provide proofs of ancient theorems, and also learn how such theorems are even known today thanks to the recovery of ancient manuscripts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Netz, R. (PI)

MUSIC 1: Musical Genius: Exemplars in the History of Organized Sound

How does music work? A broad exploration of music as defined by three major components (i) Theories of Music (elements and parameters), (ii) Histories of Music (cultures and people), and (iii) Practitioners of Music (musicians and scholars). Lecture, discussion, guided critical listening and viewing of audio, video, and live performance, and creation of self-curated mini-projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 1A: Music, Mind, and Human Behavior

An introductory exploration of the question of why music is a pervasive and fundamental aspect of human existence. The class will introduce aspects of music perception and cognition as well as anthropological and cultural considerations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 2A: The Symphony

Symphonic literature 1750 to the present, with emphasis on developing listening skills and preparation for attending a live performance. Ability to read music not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 2C: An Introduction to Opera

The lasting appeal of opera as a lavishly hybrid genre from the 1600s to the present. How and why does opera set its stories to music? What is operatic singing? Who is the audience? How do words, music, voices, movement, and staging collaborate in different operatic eras and cultures? Principal works by Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Strauss, Britten, and Adams. Class studies and attends two works performed by the San Francisco Opera.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 6A: From Gamelan to Kabuki: Musical Traditions of Far East Asia

Introduction to the musical traditions of Far East Asia. Study of prominent examples from diverse regions with an emphasis on Indonesia, China and Japan. Exploration of ethnic, social, cultural, and global perspectives. Survey of instruments and ensembles in a wide range of performance contexts, from sacred rituals to secular dance and theater. Traditional genres and their impact on contemporary composers. No musical background required. Lectures, listening to live and recorded music, attendance of a concert, video screenings.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2009 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 7B: Musical Cultures of the World

An overview of selected musical cultures from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Course objectives: cultivate an appreciation for the diversity of human musical expression; discover how music is used to shape social interactions and systems of meaning; develop active listening skills that can be used when encountering any music; gain a preliminary understanding of ethnomusicological concepts and vocabulary. No musical experience is necessary. Class format: Lecture, discussion, listening, guest performances, musical participation, and a concert analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 8A: Rock, Sex, and Rebellion

Development of critical listening skills and musical parameters through genres in the history of rock music. Focus is on competing aesthetic tendencies and subcultural forces that shaped the music. Rock's significance in American culture, and the minority communities that have enriched rock's legacy as an expressively diverse form. Lectures, readings, listening, and video screenings. Attendance at all lectures is required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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