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COMPLIT 100: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 101: What Is Comparative Literature?

The course, open to all undergraduates, is for anyone serious about literature. After first asking what "literature" is and what cultural roles it may fulfil, the course continues by exploring what, then, may be the cultural, political, historical and institutional needs to which "comparative literature" responds. A short story by Jorge Luis Borges and an accompanying essay serve as an introduction to both sets of questions. We will then look at a few texts of the western tradition from Aristotle through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, taken as standard for later ideas and practices of literature, eventually, too, at one or two that clearly acknowledge possibilities of quite different traditions for the role played by what may be called the "fictive imagination." A series of texts, two plays, two (possibly three) novels, some poems, some critical writings, will then show other traditions interacting transculturally with and/or against western ones. Students will be able to choose their readings among several.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Reiss, T. (PI)

COMPLIT 108: Contemporary Hebrew and English Poetry in Translation

A workshop in literary translation, focusing on Hebrew and English poetry and/or short prose. Together the class will engage in creating a bilingual anthology of contemporary works and discussing problems of literary translation such as preserving ambiguities, translating cultural context, literary conventions and poetic forms. Special focus on issues related to understanding and transferring the concept of "The Contemporary" between cultures. With guest translators. Advanced knowledge of Hebrew and English is required. Readings include: (Hebrew) Avot Yeshurun, Natan Zach, David Avidan, Haim Gouri, Sigal Ben-Yair, Almog Behar, Aharon Shabtai; (English) Marilyn Hacker, Annie Finch, Charles Bernstein, Ann Carson, Derek Walcott, David Whyte, Lyn Hejinian, Billy Collins,Mary Oliver, Kay Ryan. NOTE: Taught in Hebrew and English. At least some knowledge of Hebrew required. "This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit."
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 113: Feminist Poetry in the U.S., 1973-2017 (FEMGEN 113X)

Traces the development of feminist poetry in the United States from second wave feminists like Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Alicia Ostriker to contemporary poetry of Anne Boyer, Steph Burt, and Eileen Myles, among others. We will think broadly about the relationship between politics and poetry, and focus specifically on the influences of second- and third- wave feminism on poetry produced by women in the U.S. from the 1970s until today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Olidort, S. (PI)

COMPLIT 121: Poems, Poetry, Worlds (DLCL 141)

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. The readings address poetry of several cultures (Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Occitania, Peru) in comparative relation to that of the English-speaking world, and in light of classic and recent theories of poetry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 123: The Novel and the World (DLCL 143)

Before the Digital Era: the European Design of the Novel The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queiròs, Mann, Roth, Woolf, Lampedusa and Rodoreda. Lazarillo de Tormes, Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Flaubert: Madame Bovary, Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment, Eça de Queirós: The City and the Mountains, Thomas Mann: Death in Venice, Joseph Roth: Radietskymarsh, Virginia Woolf: Mrs. Dalloway, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, The Leopard, Mercé Rodoreda: The Time of the Doves
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 136: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (COMPLIT 336A, GERMAN 136, GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 145: Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature (AMELANG 126, JEWISHST 106)

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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