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AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Movement Band: Creative Methods in Intercultural Dance Technique and Performance (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday, September 28th and Monday, October 4th during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improv StratLab: Visual Performance in Art Spaces and Museums (DANCE 45)

This class will explore art/artists on the fringe of of the visual arts, projecting their work through performance. Class will consist of visiting artists, short readings, field trips, and a culminating performance to take place in the Anderson Collection. Through the exploration of these cross-disciplinary projects, students will gain a better understanding of the history of performance art, specifically in visual arts spaces; meet practicing artists; visit galleries, museums, and alternative art spaces in the Bay Area; and explore the artistic strategies used in performance or body based disciplines in order to create new, innovative or transformative ways of being and doing. Embodied thinking and improvisation is the primary methodology through which creative strategies, processes and practices are applied in both art and non-art contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 73A: Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Folkloric & Popular Dances (CSRE 73, DANCE 73)

This in-studio course provides a general introduction to some of the sacred and popular dances of the Caribbean, such as Afro-Trinidadian dances, Yanvalou, Jamaican Dancehall, Cuban rumba, and Puerto Rican salsa. From the folkloric dance forms to popular and secular dance practices, this course journeys through various islands of the Caribbean to learn about the various histories and cultures associated with each particular dance form.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 74A: Beginning Contemporary Caribbean Dance Techniques (CSRE 74A, DANCE 74)

This course will investigate how Caribbean Dance techniques can be used to create contemporary concert dance. Students will learn the varied and alternative movement practices that inform current Caribbean concert dance aesthetics-- such as techniques used in sacred Afro-Caribbean dances-- in conjunction with US contemporary techniques-- such as release technique and movement improvisation. The emphasis of this course is to explore the ways Caribbean bodies use movement and dance to create contemporary narratives for the concert stage. DANCE 74 complements and can be taken in conjunction with DANCE 73.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (MUSIC 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANES 72Q: The Art of Medical Diagnosis

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (HUMBIO 177C)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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