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AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Movement Band Performance Workshop (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create multidisciplinary fully produced production and installation. Open to student artists of different genres, styles, disciplines and levels. By audition and/or discussion with the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact (DANCE 45)

By learning various dance improvisation forms across cultures, students will develop techniques to gain a deep understanding of generating movement from the inside-out, inspired by conceptual strategies from master improvisors while harnessing that potential for creating dances. Guest dancer/choreographer workshops and Dance Jams enhance the learning experience. All Levels welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 116: Islam in Africa through the Arts (AFRICAST 216)

This course will survey the history of Islam and Muslim societies in Africa through their arts. Covering three periods (Pre-colonial, Colonial, and Post-colonial), and four geographic regions (North, East, West, and Southern Africa), the course will explore the various forms and functions of Qur anic recitation and calligraphy, architecture, illumination, dress, poetry, music, literature, portraiture, and the contemporary cinematic arts of Muslim societies on the continent from a variety of perspectives (spiritual, intellectual, aesthetic, social, political, etc.). Through these artistic works and traditions we will explore the general themes of philosophy/ theology/ mysticism, trade, Islam s relationship with other religions, state formation and revolution, gender and ethnic dynamics, colonial constructions of religious identity, diasporic communities, and contemporary conflicts and debates between Sufis, Salafis, and the state across the continent. Students will become familiar with the basic vocabulary and concepts of Islam, as well as various forms of African Islamic artistic traditions and those of African Muslim societies. Students and will become familiar with what these artistic productions mean(t) for the communities that produce(d) them, and what they can tell us about the philosophy, beliefs, history, and socioeconomic and political circumstances in which they are/were produced. This course will feature a number of creative assignments in which students will get a chance to produce their own piece of calligraphy, design their own mosque, and write their own Sufi poem or Sufi commentary on a popular song. These creative projects will be featured in an exhibit at the end of the class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (MUSIC 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANES 72Q: The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (HUMBIO 177C)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 10AX: The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mabuchi, H. (PI)
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