2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 178 results for: all courses

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion; the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing performance, structural concepts, propulsion systems, trajectories, and orbits. The history of aeronautics and astronautics. Prerequisites: MATH 20, 21 or MATH 41, 42; elementary physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 115N: The Global Positioning System: Where on Earth are We, and What Time is It?

Preference to freshmen. Why people want to know where they are: answers include cross-Pacific trips of Polynesians, missile guidance, and distraught callers. How people determine where they are: navigation technology from dead-reckoning, sextants, and satellite navigation (GPS). Hands-on experience. How GPS works; when it does not work; possibilities for improving performance.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AA 116Q: Electric Automobiles and Aircraft

Transportation accounts for nearly one-third of American energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and three-quarters of American oil consumption. It has crucial impacts on climate change, air pollution, resource depletion, and national security. Students wishing to address these issues reconsider how we move, finding sustainable transportation solutions. An introduction to the issue, covering the past and present of transportation and its impacts; examining alternative fuel proposals; and digging deeper into the most promising option: battery electric vehicles. Energy requirements of air, ground, and maritime transportation; design of electric motors, power control systems, drive trains, and batteries; and technologies for generating renewable energy. Two opportunities for hands-on experiences with electric cars. Prerequisites: Introduction to calculus and Physics AP or elementary mechanics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Enge, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 98B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 298B, ARCHLGY 98B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 77N: Functional Materials and Devices

Preference to freshmen. Exploration via case studies how functional materials have been developed and incorporated into modern devices. Particular emphasis is on magnetic and dielectric materials and devices. Recommended: high school physics course including electricity and magnetism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Suzuki, Y. (PI)

APPPHYS 79Q: Energy Options for the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. Choices for meeting the future energy needs of the U.S. and the world. Basic physics of energy sources, technologies that might be employed, and related public policy issues. Trade-offs and societal impacts of different energy sources. Policy options for making rational choices for a sustainable world energy economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 98B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 98B, ANTHRO 298B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 10N: Form and Function of Animal Skeletons (ME 10N)

Preference to freshmen. The biomechanics and mechanobiology of the musculoskeletal system in human beings and other vertebrates on the level of the whole organism, organ systems, tissues, and cell biology. Field trips to labs.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (ENGR 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints