2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 16 results for: VPGE::Specialized ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EARTH 202: PhD Students on the PhD

This seminar is designed for coterms and upperclassmen who are considering pursuing a PhD in earth science fields but want to know what that path really entails. Consisting of small-group discussions with current PhD students, this course will feature conversations on a range of PhD research topics and will also delve into the substance of the PhD experience itself. We will explore PhD students' programs and career paths: the milestones, processes, and issues that guide their decisions and shape their PhD experiences. Discussion themes will be determined partly in advance and partly based on the interests of participants and could include topics such as choosing a PhD program or research question, interdisciplinarity, community engagement, or work/life balance.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 265: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 165, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Labaree, D. (PI)

EDUC 292: Academic Writing for Clarity and Grace

Students will acquire helpful writing strategies, habits, and critical faculties; increase their sense of writing as revision; and leave them with resources that will support them in their own lifelong pursuit of good writing. Students will work on revising their own papers and editing papers of other students. Class will focus on exercises in a variety of critical writing skills: framing, concision, clarity, emphasis, rhythm, action, actors, argument, data, quotations, and usage. Course enrollment limited to graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Labaree, D. (PI)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 688A: Intensive Spoken English

For current graduate students. Includes work on listening, oral presentation, discussion, and conversational interaction. May fulfill any two of the following EFS requirements, subject to approval by the EFS Director: EFSLANG 690A, 690B, 691, 693B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rylance, C. (PI)

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 691: Oral Presentation

For advanced graduate students. Practice in academic presentation skills; strategy, design, organization, and use of visual aids. Focus is on improving fluency and delivery style, with videotaping for feedback on language accuracy and usage. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693A: Listening Comprehension

Strategies for effective listening in an academic setting, focusing on identifying key ideas in lectures. Practice in understanding words and phrases commonly encountered in classroom settings. Computer-based exercises for comprehension of rapid, natural speech. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 693B: Advanced Listening Comprehension, and Vocabulary Development

Listening strategies and vocabulary for understanding English in academic and non-academic contexts. Discussion and interpretation of communicative intent. Computer-based and video exercises across a range of genres; individual project. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints