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1 - 10 of 33 results for: VPGE::Specialized ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOS 205: Introduction to R for Data Analysis

Autumn quarter enrollment limited to ADVANCE students; instructor consent required for enrollment. Topics include: basics of R (widely used, open-source programming and data analysis environment) programming language and data structures, reading/writing files, graphics tools for figure generation, basic statistical and regression operations, survey of relevant R library packages. Interactive format combining lectures and computer lab. For course and enrollment information, see https://web.stanford.edu/~sbagley2/bios205/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Bagley, S. (PI)

EDUC 252: Introduction to Test Theory

Concepts of reliability and validity; derivation and use of test scales and norms; mathematical models and procedures for test validation, scoring, and interpretation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Domingue, B. (PI)

EDUC 252L: Introduction to Test Theory - Lab

This course will cover the material from 252A in an applied setting. Emphasis will be in developing a capacity for applying and interpreting psychometrics techniques to real-world and simulated data.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Domingue, B. (PI)

EDUC 265: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 165, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Labaree, D. (PI)

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and co more »
(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 347: The Economics of Higher Education

(Same as GSBGEN 348) Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 355: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 399A: Designing Surveys

This workshop/course is designed for students who are designing a survey for use in a research project. The workshop content draws on relevant cognitive processing theories and research (on comprehension, retrieval, judgment, and reporting). In addition to some readings and a few lectures, this workshop is designed to be highly interactive and practical. By the end of the course students will have designed and pilot tested their survey instrument. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Porteus, A. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stenhaug, B. (PI)
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