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91 - 100 of 142 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENVRES 380: Collaborating with the Future: Launching Large Scale Sustainable Transformations

This project-based d.school class combines Design Thinking Processes, Behavioral Sciences, and elements of Diffusion Theory. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create value on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. We encourage students to use this class as a launching pad for real initiatives. Primarily meant for Graduate Students. (Especially qualified/motivated Seniors will be considered). Admission to the class is through an application process which ends on March 3.nPlease find instructions and applications at https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/largetransformations/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENVRINST 277: Interdisciplinary Research Survival Skills (EARTHSYS 177, EARTHSYS 277, ENVRINST 177)

Learning in interdisciplinary situations. Framing research questions. Developing research methods that benefit from interdisciplinary understanding. Writing for multiple audiences and effectively making interdisciplinary presentations. Discussions with interdisciplinary experts from across campus regarding interdisciplinary research projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Root, T. (PI)

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FILMSTUD 364A: Technology and the Visual Imagination (ARTHIST 164A, ARTHIST 364A, FILMSTUD 164A)

An exploration of the dynamic relationship between technology and the ways we see and represent the world. The course examines technologies from the Renaissance through the present day, from telescopes and microscopes to digital detectors, that have changed and enhanced our visual capabilities as well as shaped how we imagine the world. We also consider how these technologies influenced and inspired the work of artists. Special attention is paid to how different technologies such as linear perspective, photography, cinema, and computer screens translate the visual experience into a representation; the automation of vision; and the intersection of technology with conceptions of time and space.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kessler, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 205: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. We use clips from archived talks, slide sets and posters to illustrate the good, the bad, and the ugly. Each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as their class project. The course will be 40% group meetings and 60% individual coaching. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (USGS) nThe course syllabus is the third publication in http://profile.usgs.gov/rstein
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 336E: Humanities+Design: Visualizing the Grand Tour (CLASSICS 396, DLCL 396)

Study of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour of Italy through visualization tools of the digital age. Critical readings in both visual epistemology and current Grand Tour studies; interrogating the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in digital humanities; what new insights in eighteenth-century British travel to Italy does data visualization offer us? Students will transform traditional texts and documents into digital datasets, developing individual data analysis projects using text mining, data capture and visualization techniques.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HRP 214: Scientific Writing

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly. Preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sainani, K. (PI)

HUMSCI 201: Graduate Environment of Support

Psychosocial, financial, and career issues in adapting graduate students to Stanford; how these issues relate to diversity, resources, policies, and procedures. Discussions among faculty, advanced graduate students, campus resource people, and the dean's office. (Thomas)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Thomas, A. (PI)

ILAC 309: First Year Writing Workshop

This course enables students to develop the writing skills necessary in their academic careers. Course topics include writing in the discipline, critiques, and literature reviews.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hoyos, H. (PI)
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