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51 - 60 of 142 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 208B: Curriculum Construction

The theories and methods of curriculum development and improvement. Topics: curriculum ideologies, perspectives on design, strategies for diverse learners, and the politics of curriculum construction and implementation. Students develop curriculum plans for use in real settings. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pope, D. (PI)

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 239X: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 139X, ME 139, ME 231)

The course will introduce students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and provide opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course will be both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 280X: Learning & Teaching of Science (PHYSICS 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wieman, C. (PI)

EDUC 290: Instructional Leadership: Building Capacity for Excellent Teaching

This course focuses on the role of leaders in designing, supporting and sustaining excellent teaching. How do leaders create the organizational conditions to focus attention on the technical core of instruction, curriculum and assessment. Course goals: 1) explore a variety of educational leadership approaches, 2) investigate the theory of action underlying these approaches to leadership and consider the implications for instructional practice and 3) develop understanding of the relationship between the leadership approach and the learning environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brazer, S. (PI)

EDUC 292: Academic Writing for Clarity and Grace

Students will acquire helpful writing strategies, habits, and critical faculties; increase their sense of writing as revision; and leave them with resources that will support them in their own lifelong pursuit of good writing. Students will work on revising their own papers and editing papers of other students. Class will focus on exercises in a variety of critical writing skills: framing, concision, clarity, emphasis, rhythm, action, actors, argument, data, quotations, and usage. Course enrollment limited to graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 297: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (CTL 297)

This course is co-taught by Mariatte Denman, Associate Director of the Center on Teaching and Learning. It provides POLS students with an opportunity to focus on teaching and learning along with doctoral students from many disciplines throughout the university. Students watch and interview master teachers at Stanford, prepare a syllabus module for a workshop or class they might teach, and learn a range of effective pedagogical methods. Preparing an analytic paper is an alternative for those who do not want to prepare a syllabus module. The course is open not only to POLS students who expect to work in higher education, but also to students interested in K-12 education, and they may develop a teaching module for use in those schools.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 298: Seminar on Teaching Introductory Computer Science (CS 298)

Faculty, undergraduates, and graduate students interested in teaching discuss topics raised by teaching computer science at the introductory level. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 334A: Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Practice

(Same as LAW 660A). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Koski, W. (PI)

EDUC 335X: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135X, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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