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11 - 20 of 63 results for: TAPS

TAPS 113: Creative Expression: Directing the Musical

This course would teach conductors, composers, sound engineers and directors what to consider when directing the music for a musical theater production. Students would learn to efficiently schedule and conduct rehearsals, create legible scores and parts, make a checklist for all the required nuances ie: Music stands, stand lights, stools etc. Additionally, it is evident that musicians, theater artists, dancers, lighting designers, costume designers and scenic designers all have very different cultures in the way they operate: punctuality, preparation, warm ups, expectations etc. In order to have a smooth and successful working relationship with all of these important members of a theatrical production, a musical director must understand these cultures and how to communicate with them using a language they all understand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 120A: Acting I: Scene Study

A substantive introduction to the basics of the craft of acting, this course gives all incoming students the foundation of a common vocabulary. Students will learn fundamental elements of dramatic analysis, and how to apply it in action. Topics include scene analysis, environment work, psychological and physical scoring, and development of a sound and serviceable rehearsal technique. Scene work will be chosen from accessible, contemporary, and realistic plays. Outside rehearsal time required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 120B: Acting II: Advanced Scene Study

Learn how to expand character work, beyond what is immediately familiar. Continuing basic practices from the first part of the sequence, in this quarter they will look beyond the strictly contemporary, and may begin to approach roles drawn from more challenging dramatic texts. This might include plays chosen from mid-century American classics, World Theater, or other works with specific historic or cultural requirements. Actors begin to learn how a performing artist researches and how that research can be used to enrich and deepen performance. Prerequisite: 120A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors (TAPS 20)

Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 126: Your American Life

This is a small seminar designed for students interested in creating scored stories for radio/podcast or live performance¿spoken, sonic stories. We will examine the main features and craft of these kinds of stories, popularized by radio programs like This American Life and live shows like The Moth and you will then write and produce your own piece, be it memoir, documentary, inquiry, or some combination of these genres. Students will have the opportunity to meet at work with some of the best storytellers in America¿this term, you will get to meet and work with Julie Snyder, senior producer of This American Life.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 127: Dynamics of Conflict: Contact and Combat in Performance

How do experiments in movement help artists mine a play for its meanings? How does physical staging illuminate for the audience truths about characters, relationships and the arc of a scene? What can actors learn about themselves and their ensemble through physical improvisation and composition? This course is for students interested in movement and dynamic storytelling; no prior training is required. We will explore the fundamentals of contact improvisation and stage combat as a means of strengthening mind-body connection and preparing the actor for more nuanced, compelling, emotionally-rooted work on the stage. Our training consists of four main components: physical conditioning, practical technique, movement improvisation and the creation of several short performance pieces.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hazas, T. (PI)

TAPS 133: Stage Scenery Design

Craft and Theory of stage scenery design including visual research, spatial organization, basic drafting, sketching and model-building. Prerequisite: 30, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 140: Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Drama Department or other Stanford University student theatre projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Linda AppersonnPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 151T: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakepeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 159: Introduction to Game Studies

Games are not new; they are older than civilization. But in the past 50 years or so, we have seen an explosion of creativity in the development of new games, many of which, especially video games, complicate older understandings of what games are. This explosion of creativity has been matched by the increasing visibility and ubiquity of new games and ways of seeing games: as video games, televised professional sports, and even distributed urban events.n nGames are not a simple object of study. There are many ways to understand them: as social practices, as formal systems, as representative artwork, as modes of learning, and many more. We will start by considering games as a mode of performance, considering games in relation to theater and other forms of aesthetic performance. However, we will take a deeply interdisciplinary approach to the study of games, and will draw on perspectives from design, philosophy, education, and the emerging discipline of video game studies. We will also, of course, draw on a variety of games, both online and offline. As we bring in these perspectives, we will begin to consider games in at least two other fundamental ways: as designed experiences and as composed systems or artworks.nnThis course is less an attempt to provide a survey of the entire field of games. It is more an attempt to provide a basic toolbox for critically examining and analyzing games. These tools are potentially useful for anyone who interacts with games: whether as a consumer of entertainment, a critical analyst of play, a user of serious games, or a game designer.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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