2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

71 - 80 of 235 results for: TAPS

TAPS 138: Sound Design

This is a hands-on, workshop-oriented course in sound design with an emphasis on sound for live performance. Its focus is on rapidly developing technical skills and intuitions for crafting beautiful, meaningful sounds. These skills are potentially useful to persons with interest in the fields of technical theater and dance, electronic music, game design, interior design, and experience design. Topics include wave editing; sound and music curation; audio spatialization; the qualitative study of filters; show control; sound reinforcement; interactive audio; and the use of tone, dynamics, and timbre to create moods and impressions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Drama Department or other Stanford University student theatre projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Linda AppersonnPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 144: Puppetry with a Twist (TAPS 344)

Creative course is an introduction to puppetry with a survey of important styles and techniques from around the world including Twist's own. Hands on and individualized experience with the aim of each student creating or contributing to a puppet or object/figure performance. Course is as broad as the individual's creative expression.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 150: British Theatre Then and Now: 1890s-present

This introductory course covers some of the `golden ages¿ of British Theatre from 1890 to the present: the stylish and witty `New Drama¿ of the Edwardian era with writers such as George Bernard Shaw and Oscar Wilde exploring sex and politics in the wake of Ibsen¿s A Doll¿s House; the artistic innovations of the 1950s and 60s from seminal writers such as Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter and Tom Stoppard; and more recent works by modern legends Caryl Churchill, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, and immersive or interactive theatre by companies such as Punch Drunk. We will also look at the ever changing relationship with Shakespeare across generations of British theatre artists, including directors such as Peter Brook and Deborah Warner.nIn this class students will explore the relationship between theatre, politics and culture across fascinating eras in British history as well as thinking about the role of theatre in our own lives and social contexts. We will ask the questions: What is theatre for? What meaning does it have for a contemporary audience? How can it reflect our times? Has the communal audience experience of going to the theatre changed in an age that is dominated by social media and broadcast technology? Has this changed the way that people make theatre? What do we as audiences want from the theatre? What do we as theatre makers want from audiences?nStudents will read plays weekly and also see screenings of several excellent film versions of the plays as well as participating in staged readings of scenes and class discussions. The class will also attend at least one live theatre event. This is a perfect class for students who enjoy active learning, approaching the texts as scholars and historians, but also working with the plays creatively, engaging the imagination as potential actors, directors, designers and/or dramaturgs.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 150T: Transnational Sexualities (CSRE 150T, FEMGEN 150T, FEMGEN 250T, TAPS 250T)

Transnational Sexualites is an inter-disciplinary course that considers the aesthetic, social, and political formation of sexual subjectivities in a global world. How does the transnational traffic of people, media, images, finance, and commodities shape the force-fields of desire? What is the relationship between political economies and libidinal economies? The course will explore the erotics of race and religion, neoliberalism and globalization within a wide range geo-political contexts including Indonesia, China, Egypt, India, South Africa, US, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 151A: Theater of the Asia-Pacific Region (TAPS 251A)

This course offers a historical and cultural exploration of theatre forms and performance cultures from various countries that border the Pacific Ocean, as well as from island communities within Oceania. Taking the term 'Asia-Pacific' as a provocation and point of interrogation, we will assess how theatrical production from this broad area can help us think through questions of nationalism, regionalism, interculturalism, and diaspora, while deepening our appreciation of world theatre history. The first part of the course focuses on theatre in specific sites, covering classical forms from China, Japan, and Indonesia, as well as indigenous theatre and performance from several Pacific Islands, including the Cook Islands, S'moa, Aotearoa/New Zealand, and Hawai`i. The second part of the course centers on the ocean as a dynamic space of mobility, examining a range of recent plays and performances that trace identities on the move and across borders, and which reveal how various Asian and Pacific Islander communities have engaged with each other in locations from Australia to the west coast of the United States. In so doing, our course will chart connections and divergences that enable fresh insights into the geographical and cultural dimensions of global theatre.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 151C: Hamlet and the Critics (ENGLISH 115C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamletas a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

TAPS 151D: The Critic as Artist (DANCE 33)

Criticism is art. It therefore must aspire to reach the heights, depths and strange in-betweens it grapples with in the art of others. Yet criticism owes a singular responsibility to these others, and to the wider culture it seeks to interrogate. Our interrogation will be generated by dance and performance criticism, with possible forays into live visual art, theater, hybrid forms and whatever else we think might suit our purposes. Various methodologies will be debated and employed throughout the semester, as students are encouraged to begin (or continue) developing personal philosophies and voices through their writing. Our meetings will be hands-on affairs, guided by student experiments. ¿Experiments¿ is a key word¿this class will function like a laboratory, an introduction to an unruly literary art form that is open to all individuals with an interest in better understanding themselves and their world through words and art.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 151H: ID21 STRATLAB: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Improvising Identities (AMSTUD 151H, CSRE 151H, DANCE 151H, DANCE 251H, TAPS 351H)

A quarter-long exploration of improvisation in relationship to identity and race in the 21st century in which students investigate new dynamics of doing and thinking identities through the arts. Panel discussions, performances, and talks that engage critically with the theme, concept, and practice of improvising identity across a variety of contexts and genres such as jazz music, modern dance, contemporary art, race comedy, food, and hip-hop poetry/freestyle. Strategies that artists/scholars have used to overturn essentializing notions of identity in theory and practice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 151T: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (COMPLIT 151B, COMPLIT 351B, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakepeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints