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11 - 16 of 16 results for: SLAVIC

SLAVIC 329: Russian Versification: History and Theory (SLAVIC 129)

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 129 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 345: Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment (SLAVIC 145)

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 145 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 356: Vladimir Nabokov: Displacement and the Liberated Eye (COMPLIT 115, COMPLIT 315, SLAVIC 156)

How did the triumphant author of "the great American novel" Lolita evolve from the young author writing at white heat for the tiny sad Russian emigration in Berlin? We will read his short stories and the novels The Luzhin Defense, Invitation to a Beheading, Lolita, Lolita the film, and Pale Fire, to see how Nabokov generated his sinister-playful forms as a buoyant answer to the "hypermodern" visual and film culture of pre-WWII Berlin, and then to America's all-pervading postwar "normalcy" in his pathological comic masterpieces Lolita and Pale Fire. Buy texts in translation at the Bookstore; Slavic grad students will supplement with reading and extra sessions in original Russian.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 361: Reading Leo Tolstoy in the Digital Age (SLAVIC 261)

The novelist and philosopher Leo Tolstoy pioneered ideas of multi-perspectivism, relativism, "contagious" art, and literary montage. How can we analyze the link between his prose fiction and modernist art by means of digital humanities methods? This course is arranged as a series of digital labs and seminar discussions and utilizes a project-based learning approach, with individual and collaborative projects. We create character networks in Gephi, side-by-side visualization of different versions of Tolstoy's texts in Beyond Compare, and text mining in RStudio. Taught in English. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 261 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SLAVIC 399: INDIVIDUAL WORK

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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