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31 - 35 of 35 results for: PSYC

PSYC 236A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 136A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 236B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live Better (PSYC 136B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 239: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 139)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 247: Principles and Practices in Care of the Dying

Detailed, systematic survey of a generalized terminal illness and elaboration of the basic principles underlying approaches to the care of the dying. Particular attention is paid to problem areas involving medical ethics and multi-culture. Practical strategies for managing the special medical and emotional problems that arise in the care of the dying patient. There may be guest speakers and patient interviews. No final examination. (Minimum: 4 students)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in twomajor psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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