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41 - 50 of 55 results for: PHIL

PHIL 281: Philosophy of Language (PHIL 181)

The study of conceptual questions about language as a focus of contemporary philosophy for its inherent interest and because philosophers see questions about language as behind perennial questions in other areas of philosophy including epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics, and ethics. Key concepts and debates about the notions of meaning, truth, reference, and language use, with relations to psycholinguistics and formal semantics. Readings from philosophers such as Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Grice, and Kripke. Prerequisites: 80 and background in logic.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crimmins, M. (PI)

PHIL 281C: Slurs and derogatory language (PHIL 181C)

Do slurring words differ in semantic character from their so-called neutral counterparts? If so how do we explain the difference in meaning between a slur and its neutral counterpart. Or is slurring better explained by appeal to the resources of pragmatics, speech act theory or sociolinguistics? What is the source of the offensiveness of a slur? How can mere words subordinate and marginalize? We attempt to answer these and other questions about slurs and derogatory language. nA previous course in either the philosophy of language or linguistic semantics or pragmatics is strongly recommended, though students without such background who are willing to do additional reading to fill in gaps in their knowledge are also welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Taylor, K. (PI)

PHIL 287: Philosophy of Action (PHIL 187)

(Graduate students register for 287.) Contemporary research in the philosophy of action. Topics include: What is it to be an agent? Is there a philosophically defensible contrast between being an agent and being a locus of causal forces to which one is subject? What is it to act purposively? What is intention? What is the relation between intention and belief? What is it to act intentionally? What is it to act for a reason? What is the relation between explaining why someone acted by citing the reasons for which she acted and causal explanation of her action? What is the relation between theoretical and practical rationality? What is the nature of our knowledge of our own intentional activity? What is it to act autonomously? What is shared cooperative activity? Prerequisite: 80.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 301: Dissertation Development Proseminar

A required seminar for third year philosophy PhD students, designed to extend and consolidate work done in the dissertation development seminar the previous summer.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Code, A. (PI)

PHIL 315: Aristotle's Protrepticus and its Background (CLASSICS 346)

In this seminar, we shall read Aristotle's Protrepticus. This is an early work of Aristotle that attempts to turn the reader to a philosophic life and it is by far the least read of his works on ethics. It was only recovered in the 19th century and only in the past 15 years or so do we have a reliable text. Thus studies of it are very much underdeveloped. We shall also read as background some other protreptic works by Plato and the rhetorician Isocrates. 2 unit option is only for Philosophy PhD students beyond the second year.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bobonich, C. (PI)

PHIL 322: Hume

Hume's theoretical philosophy emphasizing skepticism and naturalism, the theory of ideas and belief, space and time, causation and necessity, induction and laws of nature, miracles, a priori reasoning, the external world, and the identity of the self. 2 unit option only for Philosophy PhD students beyond the relevant PhD distribution requirements. Prerequisites: Undergraduates wishing to take this course must have previously taken History of Modern Philosophy or the equivalent, and may only enroll with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 327: Scientific Philosophy: From Kant to Kuhn and Beyond

Examines the development of scientific philosophy from Kant, through the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, to the neo-Kantian scientific tradition initiated by Hermann von Helmholtz and the neo-Kantian history and philosophy of science of Ernst Cassirer and Thomas Kuhn. Proposes a post-Kuhnian approach to the history and philosophy of science in light of these developments.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Friedman, M. (PI)

PHIL 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, ENGLISH 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. In this year's installment of the seminar, we will focus on issues about the nature of fiction, about the experience of appreciation and what it does for us, about the ethical consequences of imaginative fictions, and about different conceptions of the importance of the arts in life more broadly. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 351D: Measurement Theory

What does it mean to assign numbers to beliefs (as Bayesian probability theorists do), desires (as economists and philosophers who discuss utilities do), or perceptions (as researchers in psychometrics often do)? What is the relationship between the numbers and the underlying reality they purport to measure? Measurement theory helps answer these questions using representation theorems, which link structural features of numerical scales (such as probabilities, utilities, or degrees of loudness) to structural features of relations (such as comparative belief, preference, or judgments that one sound is louder than another).nThis course will introduce students to measurement theory, and its applications in psychophysics and decision theory. n2 unit option only for Philosophy PhD students who are past their second year.nPrerequisites: Undergraduates wishing to take this course must have previously taken PHIL150, and may only enroll with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 356C: Logic and Artificial Intelligence (CS 257)

This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. I more »
This is a course at the intersection of philosophical logic and artificial intelligence. After reviewing recent work in AI that has leveraged ideas from logic, we will slow down and study in more detail various components of high-level intelligence and the tools that have been designed to capture those components. Specific areas will include: reasoning about belief and action, causality and counterfactuals, legal and normative reasoning, natural language inference, and Turing-complete logical formalisms including (probabilistic) logic programming and lambda calculus. Our main concern will be understanding the logical tools themselves, including their formal properties and how they relate to other tools such as probability and statistics. At the end, students should expect to have learned a lot more about logic, and also to have a sense for how logic has been and can be used in AI applications. Prerequisites: A background in logic, at least at the level of Phil 151, will be expected. In case a student is willing to put in the extra work to catch up, it may be possible to take the course with background equivalent to Phil 150 or CS 157. A background in AI, at the level of CS 221, would also be very helpful and will at times be expected. 2 unit option only for PhD students past the second year. Course website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cs257/
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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