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1 - 5 of 5 results for: PATHWAYS::policy

ANTHRO 337: The Politics of Humanitarianism

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the cause of humanity. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

LAW 805C: Policy Practicum: Campaign Finance Task Force

This policy practicum will engage students to perform research on a number of topics related to the financing of election campaigns, with a particular eye on developments that have taken place in the 2016 election. The client is a national campaign finance task force led by former White House Counsel Robert Bauer and former Romney and Bush campaign Counsel Ben Ginsberg. Research areas would include: How has the financing of campaigns changed following Citizens United? How have candidates, parties and groups altered spending to account for the rise of the internet as a medium of political communication? Have developments in outside spending affected the power of political parties? How has primary campaign spending changed as a result of rising political polarization? This policy practicum will not meet regularly; each student will meet periodically with Professor Persily to determine a research topic and a strategy for developing a paper to be handed in by the end of the term. Elements used in grading: Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions: Health Directives in Law and Practice

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and the families of patients. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. People have been encouraged to fill out "Advanced Health Care Directives," which give guidance to doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST form (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants, or thinks she wants, and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. It is a one page form, printed on bright pink paper. It is signed by patient and doctor. The directives (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") are supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? In what situations are they not useful? Can they be made more useful and, if so, how? Students will look at some of the current literature on the topic and work from past practicum work, but the main point is to find out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. Students will conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists in order to find out what one might call the living law of the Directive and of POLST. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the situation in the area: How are these forms used? When are they used? What is the experience of health care professionals with the forms? What is the experience of patients and family members? The ultimate goal would be policy recommendations for improvements in the forms themselves and in associated laws, along with recommendations to improve how the forms can be used - or whether some entirely different approach might be needed. Stanford Hospital and Clinics will be the client in researching and addressing the above questions. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 805L: Policy Practicum: Native Brief Project

Students will participate in the Native Amicus Brief Project, http://nativebrief.sites.yale.edu/, a national non-profit that tracks Indian law cases in the lower federal courts and, where warranted, students will research and assist in drafting amicus briefs. Because federal Indian law is complex and often requires knowledge of tribes' unique histories and cultures, amicus briefs can play a crucial role in fostering greater understanding and awareness of Indian law issues. Using Bloomberg Law, students will identify cases involving Indian law issues and summarize them for upload into the Tracking Wiki. Key current issues in federal Indian law cases include questions of federal power and tribal jurisdiction, race and equal protection, gaming, and environmental law and policy. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct research for future amicus briefs in Indian law cases, and may also have opportunities to assist in brief drafting. Extended research opportunities are possible for students enrolled in Section 02, which meets the Research requirement. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 (2 units) into Section 02 (3 units), which meets the Research requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, individual meetings with professor; written research memoranda. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Ablavsky, G. (PI)

LAW 805P: Policy Practicum: Incentivizing Renewable Energy Storage and Transmission

The two key enablers of renewable energy today are storage and transmission. Storage -- using batteries, thermal systems, compressed air, water pumping and beyond -- is critical to dealing with the intermittency of solar and wind by shifting the use of electricity from when it is generated to when there is greater customer need and economic value -- whether over an hour, day or month. Transmission is critical because resource-rich areas of generation tend to be located far from urban load centers, plus local variations in sun and wind can be smoothed out with significant inter-regional transmission connections. Transmission development in the U.S. is inadequate today largely because of conflicts at the state and federal level over siting and cost allocation. Storage is relatively immature technologically, the costs of a number of promising options are high, and key state and federal policies governing its deployment need further development. Yet, without rapid and cost-effective deployment of storage and transmission, the environmental and economic promise of renewables will not be realized. Dan Reicher and Jeff Brown, who teach energy courses at the Stanford Law and Business schools, will guide the I-REST Policy Practicum research team in exploring policy, finance and technology tools that could accelerate the development and deployment of U.S. storage and transmission projects. Student researchers will work closely with Dan and Jeff to address key issues. Some examples of these issues include: 1. Many storage technologies are not fully cost competitive in the absence of an adequate price for avoided carbon emissions. As a result, gas turbines often have to fill the gap when solar and wind are not available. Without a significant price on carbon, what are the optimum federal policy and finance tools to incentivize storage projects -- grants, tax credits, loan guarantees, MLPs/REITs, contract for differences, credits for low-carbon capacity, etc? 2. Storage is part of a larger package of options -- demand response, efficiency, grid management, fast-firing gas turbines -- to deal with intermittent renewables. What are the state and federal policy options, and associated investment vehicles, that can best ensure smart and cost-effective integration of these approaches. 3. Recent multi-state transmission projects have pitted developers against the states that are in the path of the line but do not benefit from either the generation or sale of the green electricity. In some situations the federal government has had to assert its eminent domain authority, including through the DOE-controlled Power Marketing Administrations. How do we better balance these various interests in siting multi-state transmission projects? 4. Like storage options, major, regionally dispersed transmission networks might be an effective way to move renewable and low-carbon energy to demand centers in response to hourly, daily and seasonal variations in renewable energy production. However, these transmission lines tend to be challenging financially because of relatively low usage levels. What policy and financing tools might advance this different business model? 5. Typically high voltage alternating current (A.C.) transmission lines become economically challenged at distances beyond 600 miles, with load losses and carrying capacity dropping rapidly with distance. More robust and efficient, direct current (D.C.) lines require special converter stations and other major equipment to rejoin local grids. How should federal government policymakers and regulators weigh in on this technological issue and what are potential financing tools? Research results, in the form of memos and an overall white paper or report will help guide the transition team for the new President, the incoming Administration, and the new Congress in formulating policies and supporting investment that can help advance progress on transmission and storage thereby enabling accelerated renewable energy deployment and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Associated briefings in Washington, D.C. may be arranged with students making the trip. As described above, storage and transmission issues present a complex set of legal, regulatory, engineering, economic and financial challenges. Therefore, the research team seeks graduate students from law, business, engineering, economics, and public policy. Through this interdisciplinary research and learning environment, the team will leverage approaches across fields to produce a robust, integrated set of research findings that will also be featured on both the Policy Lab and Steyer-Taylor websites. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from Section 01 (2 units) to Section 2 (3 units), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
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