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1 - 10 of 18 results for: PATHWAYS::celr ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHPR 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (HRP 218, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 228: Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (MED 255C)

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Stafford, R. (PI)

EDUC 170: Preparation for Independent Public Service Projects

Open only to recipients of the Haas Summer Fellowship, which offers students the opportunity to initiate and carry out an innovative service project in collaboration with a community partner. Goal is to expand upon the work fellows did during the application process with respect to the feasibility and sustainability of their field projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine.Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets, for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public, and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. Pre-requisite to the course to be a SHAR(ED) volunteer.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wang, N. (PI)

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 399A: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 299X)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 218: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, HRP 218)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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