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21 - 30 of 37 results for: MKTG

MKTG 554: Branding in the Digital Era

A strong brand is the most valuable and irreplaceable asset for a firm. Apple, Google, Coca Cola, Nike, VISA, McDonalds, and Disney, are a few prominent examples of legendary brands. Many companies recognize that the investment they make in the creation and communication of their brand will become a strategic differentiator in the future.n nThis course is designed to provide students with theoretical as well as applied appreciation and understanding of what it takes to build and sustain strong bands. To achieve these goals, the class will be co-taught by two academic and industry experts who will not only provide basic insights into branding basics but will also discuss cutting-edge research and technological developments in the area.n nProf. Khan will lead the first half of the course. This week will focus on conceptual and strategic frameworks for understanding basic branding concepts and answering core challenges such as, how to define and establish brand meaning and personality; how to measure and leverage brand equity; how to manage brand architecture; and how to establish brand leadership.n nIn the second week, the focus will switch to digital aspects of branding. This week will be led by Mr. Gopi Kallayil, Chief Evangelist, Brand Marketing, at Google. Mr. Kallayil will explore contemporary issues in brand marketing such as, how to construct and maintain brand meaning in the high customer involvement digital space; how to seize the opportunity of your super fans actively expressing brand love on digital; and how to leverage new customer experiences created with digital in branding strategy.n nStudents are required to attend and come prepared to all classes.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Khan, U. (PI)

MKTG 555: Designing Happiness

We assume happiness is stable, an endpoint to achieve or a goal to "chase." It's not. Recent research suggests that the meaning of happiness changes every 3-4 years. Understanding happiness is crucial to building successful products, organizations and relationships. In this MBA seminar, we explore the data-driven research on happiness, revealing insights about (a) anticipating, (b) understanding, (c) visualizing, (d) spreading, (e) remembering, and (f) creating happiness. Students will work together to use an iterative design-thinking approach to understand our own current definition of happiness, uncover what really makes us happy (vs. what we think makes us happy), prototype solutions/products to increase our present happiness, and develop tools to continually understand and foster happiness as our lives change. The seminar will be data-driven, drawing on multiple methodologies including blogs ( http://www.wefeelfine.org/), experiments and surveys.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MKTG 574: Rethinking Purpose

We assume happiness is stable, an endpoint to achieve our goal to chase. It's not. Recent behavioral research suggests that the meaning of happiness changes every 5-10 years, raising the question: how might we build organizations and lives that cultivate happiness? Research suggests it is better to aim for meaning. In Rethinking Purpose, we explore how to rethink purpose in work and life. Students will hear from guests and take a field trip to see how Google has reconsidered purpose. Building on the principles for Solve for X ( www.solveforx.com), a platform encouraging moonshot thinking to solve huge problems in the world, we'll harness design thinking principles to create personal moonshots and a path to continue to find those moonshots over the life course. Lastly, we'll map out how to use time in ways that would help build innovative teams, products, and ultimately lives that have positive, meaningful, lasting impact in the world. If you take this course, please save Feb 20th 2016 (Sat, 10-6pm) at the d.school for an immersive day to serve foundation for this 2 week class.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

MKTG 575: Consumer Behavior

Contemporary approaches to marketing emphasize the importance of adopting a consumer focus, from determining consumers' wants and needs, understanding their motivation, to shaping their attitudes and ensuring their loyalty. This course provides insight into consumer psychology and the means by which consumer behavior can be influenced or altered. The course has both theoretical and practical objectives in that we will: (1) explore theory and research that is relevant to understanding consumer psychology, (2) apply these theories and findings to generate novel ideas for effective marketing techniques. By shedding light on the psychological underpinnings of consumers' motivation, attitudes, preferences, and decision-making styles, this course will help students make more insightful and effective marketing decisions, as well as developing novel ideas for grabbing attention, shaping behavior, and changing consumers' minds.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Huang, S. (PI)

MKTG 576: Digital Marketing

There has been a rapid evolution of digital means of communicating with consumers and advertising to them, driven by changes in technologies and consumer behavior. Readership of traditional print media has gone down dramatically, and television is consumed very differently now than even a few years ago, with the advent of digital video recording and streaming video platforms. This has led to a dramatic growth of marketing using digital platforms. Furthermore, a variety of avenues for digital marketing has emerged, including display advertising, search advertising, advertising on online video platforms, advertising and other forms of engagement on social networks etc. A recent trend has been the rapid growth of mobile platforms, which include these different avenues also available. An integrated view of using these different media to market to consumers is important to effective digital marketing. With the rapid acceptance of numerous "Big Data" technologies by large enterprises, online marketing is also evolving to incorporate a customer-centric view rather than a campaign centric view. This course will explore these issues.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

MKTG 622: Behavioral Research in Marketing III: Consumer Behavior Classics

The purpose of this seminar is to provide PhD level coverage of the major research work carried out in consumer behavior. For each topic considered, a selection of articles with a specific focus on "early classics" will be distributed and discussed. For each topic, our goals will be to determine the main ideas and research questions driving work in each topic area, how these authors positioned their work and tested their ideas, what made these papers "classics," where the gaps are, and what ideas for new research those gaps imply.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Huang, S. (PI)

MKTG 641: Behavioral Research in Marketing I

This course prepares the student to do empirical behavioral research. It will cover all aspects of the research process, from hypothesis generation to experimental design to data analysis to writing up your results and submitting them for publication.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Wheeler, S. (PI)

MKTG 642: Behavioral Research in Marketing II: Consumer Behavior

This PhD seminar provides coverage of the major research carried out in consumer research both in marketing and psychology. A vast set of topic will be covered including conscious and non-conscious consumer goals, motivations, emotions, attention and perception and consumer decision processes. The course will help students hone their ability to conceptualize, operationalize, and develop research idea and will provide a grasp of what it takes to be a successful academic in the field of consumer behavior.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Khan, U. (PI)

MKTG 644: Quantitative Research in Marketing

The goal of this seminar is to familiarize students with the quantitative marketing literature and develop the process of generating research ideas and topics. Sessions will involve a mix of: nnni) a discussion of papers in a particular area in quantitative marketing; and/or nnii) a discussion of students' research ideas with respect to topics. nnnThe format will mix student presentations of papers with lectures by the instructor(s). When discussing papers in the literature, the focus will be on the topic and research question and not the methodological approach. When discussing research ideas, students should be able to articulate why their question is interesting, where it fits in the literature and how they would address their question.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Sahni, N. (PI)

MKTG 645: Empirical Analysis of Dynamic Decision Contexts

This course will focus on empirical tools for analyzing dynamic decision contexts, wherein current actions of firms or consumers have effects on future payoffs, profits and/or competitive conduct. The course will build the relevant material generally, but our applications will be mostly focused on empirical marketing, operations and industrial organization problems. We will have an applied focus overall, emphasizing the practical aspects of implementation, especially programming. The overall aim of the class is to help students obtain the skills to implement these methods in their research. By the end of the class, students are expected to be able to formulate a dynamic decision problem, program it in a language such as Matlab or C, and to estimate the model from data. The course starts with an overview of consumer theory and static models of consumer choice. We build on this material and introduce discrete choice markovian decision problems, and continuous markovian decision problems, and focus on building the computational toolkit for the numerical analysis of these problems. We then move on to specific applications, and discuss multi-agent dynamic equilibrium models. Finally, we discuss recently proposed advanced methods for alleviating computational burden in dynamic models.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Nair, H. (PI)
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