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1 - 10 of 124 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 3C: Talking About Jews (JEWISHST 3C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 7G: Making Anglo-American Capitalism (HISTORY 107G)

This course addresses capitalism in global perspective to identify the roots of our current economic system. We will consider theories about capitalism, the politics and policies of implementation, and the human and environmental consequences through topics such as the imperial political economy, consumerism, plantation economies, the East India Company, and the rise of credit. Embedding markets in a range of social relations, cultural practices, and institutional arrangements, reveals how capital became an -ism in specific and knowable historical circumstances.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorner, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 7N: Humanitarianism and Its Histories

This seminar will explore when and under what circumstances humanitarian sensibilities, including the idea of human rights, became powerful components of modern politics and ethical thinking. Far from being a straightforward ideology, humanitarianism has been invoked in myriad ways ¿ both idealistically and cynically ¿ in the course of modern history, in debates over phenomena as varied as slavery, colonialism, world war, genocide, famine, and immigration. As a result, contemporary ethical motivations for assisting those in need remain deeply shaded by humanitarianism¿s long engagement with political categories, ideologies, and practices of the past, including Christianity, race, liberalism, capitalism, and imperialism. We will examine the shifting narratives and media strategies that activists, NGOs, and governments have employed to draw widespread attention to crises and abuses from the late eighteenth century to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 8S: Counterinsurgency and Torture: Algeria, Vietnam, and Iraq

How are the post-WWII guerrilla wars in Algeria, Vietnam, and Iraq connected? How have French and American counterinsurgency planners applied ¿lessons learned¿ from prior wars? Are torture and violence against civilians the results of mishandled counterinsurgency, or are they inherent to the doctrine? Why have counterinsurgency strategies persisted despite long-term failures and public criticism? We will apply historical thinking to current debates by examining declassified government documents, films, photographs, music, television and radio broadcasts, memoirs, graffiti, and Oval Office tapes. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gruskin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 10C: The Problem of Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110C.) From the late 18th century to the present. How Europeans responded to rapid social changes caused by political upheaval, industrialization, and modernization. How the experience and legacy of imperialism and colonialism both influenced European society and put in motion a process of globalization that continues to shape international politics today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 13C: Talking About Jews (JEWISHST 13C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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