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121 - 130 of 131 results for: HAAS::CEL

SPANLANG 101: The Structure of Spanish

Criteria and skills to analyze Spanish grammatical structure. Identification of word functions in sentences and texts, types of sentences, and terminology. Structure of nouns, adjectives, and verbs, and their relationship with meaning. The differences between Spanish grammar as a formal system and in everyday life.Students who wish to participate in the optional community engaged learning component should sign up for Spanlang 101SL (below). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miano, A. (PI)

STS 200A: Food and Society: Politics, Culture and Technology

This course will examine how politics, culture, and technology intersect in our food practices. Through a survey of academic, journalistic, and artistic works on food and eating, the course will explore a set of key analytical frameworks and conceptual tools in STS, such as the politics of technology, classification and identity, and nature/culture boundaries. The topics covered include: the industrialization of agriculture; technology and the modes of eating (e.g., the rise of restaurants); food taboos; globalization and local foodways; food and environmentalism; and new technologies in production (e.g., genetically modified food). Through food as a window, the course intends to achieve two broad intellectual goals. First, students will explore various theoretical and methodological approaches in STS. In particular, they will pay particular attention to the ways in which politics, culture, and technology intersect in food practices. Second, student will develop a set of basic skills and tools for their own critical thinking and empirical research, and design and conduct independent research on a topic related to food. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Designing Cities for People

Cities and real estate generate lively public discussions, passionate community meetings, and political shouting matches. But how does a project actually get proposed and built? We explore the key actors and influencers in the urban built environment, ranging from urban planners to real estate developers to community advocates. This intensive d.school experience aims to deepen our insights about stakeholders, so that we gain a more empathetic understanding of how a city is built, and identify potential opportunities for improving the process of urban intervention and regeneration to be more responsive to citizens and responsible to society. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Course meets at the d.school in Studio 2.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 126: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, RELIGST 162X)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 145: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, EARTHSYS 138, IPS 274)

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Terms: not given next year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 150: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, HISTORY 252E)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given next year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 166: East Palo Alto: Reading Urban Change

Examines the changes in East Palo Alto's built environment, economy, and civil society since the 1990s. Focus on environmental activism, sustainability, and environmental justice issues. Students use archived film footage to analyze the history.
Terms: given next year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 181: Urban Agriculture in the Developing World (EARTHSYS 181, EARTHSYS 281, ESS 181, ESS 281)

In this advanced undergraduate course, students will learn about some of the key social and environmental challenges faced by cities in the developing world, and the current and potential role that urban agriculture plays in meeting (or exacerbating) those challenges. This is a service-learning course, and student teams will have the opportunity to partner with real partner organizations in a major developing world city to define and execute a project focused on urban development, and the current or potential role of urban agriculture. Service-learning projects will employ primarily the student's analytical skills such as synthesis of existing research findings, interdisciplinary experimental design, quantitative data analysis and visualization, GIS, and qualitative data collection through interviews and textual analysis. Previous coursework in the aforementioned analytical skills is preferred, but not required. Admission is by application.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 201: Preparation for Senior Project (SOC 201)

First part of capstone experience for Urban Studies majors pursuing an internship-based research project or honors thesis. Assignments culminate in a research proposal, which may be submitted for funding. Students also identify and prepare for a related internship, normally to begin in Spring Quarter in URBANST 201B or in Summer. Research proposed in the final assignment may be carried out in Spring or Summer Quarter; consent required for Autumn Quarter research. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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