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1 - 10 of 18 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 314: Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies

This course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments. The core of the course is a team-based exercise involving the development of a deep understanding of the team's chosen country of focus with respect to the opportunities and challenges for starting a new business. Interested students must come in willing to be team players and do the work necessary to complete this exercise over the full quarter. Each team member's contributions will be assessed by fellow teammates. Students will submit country preferences before the quarter begins and teams will be formed on the first day. The teams will identify what they think would be a high potential opportunity for innovative entrepreneurship in their country that they will evaluate using the country-specific knowledge they've developed. The team will describe, in a final written paper and presentation, the challenges and opportunities in their country using a framework from the recently published World Economic Forum report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics." The final materials will also include the team's thoughts on the viability of their proposed venture and how it capitalizes on their country's assets and addresses its challenges. A detailed business plan is not required; however, specific recommendations and plans for next steps that would be carried out during a 3 to 6 month field and market research study in the country will be part of the final presentation. In effect, the team will answer the questions: Why do they think this new proposed venture is viable in the specific developing economy given the country's specific opportunities and challenges?; and, What would the group do "in country" to confirm the viability and complete the plans to actually start and grow the business? Based on feedback from instructors and students in the inaugural class last year, some revisions have been incorporated, - more interaction with instructors; fewer case studies; expert guest speakers more focused on a specific topic to share their relevant experiences; a shortened reading list including new notes written on key topics to replace existing readings; and some "flipped" class sessions allowing time for teams to work in class on their projects. Since the course is still evolving, we particularly want to attract students who would enjoy helping further develop the course since this is an arena that begs for new approaches and material. This course will relate to the work being done in SEED, under the theory that healthy entrepreneurship and innovation will improve the overall economy and reduce poverty. Most countries that have successfully grown out of poverty did not do it by focusing only on Bottom of Pyramid (BoP) businesses, but by promoting healthy business growth overall. Helping entrepreneurs build successful new ventures in a developing economy is an essential element of an overall strategy for moving a country out of poverty. BoP businesses have tended to grow slowly, and struggle to raise capital, often being forced to pay low wages, etc. Without complementing these businesses with strong, high-potential, high-growth, profit-making businesses, none of these developing economies are likely to progress economically or eliminate poverty. A prosperous business with a solid plan will help the country, the economy, and ultimately the poor.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Abbey, D. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Bannick, M. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Binsbergen, J. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Bowman, K. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Chess, R. (PI) ; Ciesinski, S. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Dodson, D. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Ellis, J. (PI) ; Enthoven, A. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Finan, F. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Gerardo Lietz, N. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Guttentag, B. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Holloway, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Hurley, J. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Ishii, J. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Johnson, F. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Korteweg, A. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Leslie, M. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Levine, P. (PI) ; Linbeck, L. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; March, J. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; Marks, M. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Meehan, B. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Parker, G. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Powers, J. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reicher, D. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Scholes, M. (PI) ; Schramm, J. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Siegelman, R. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Thurber, M. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 646: Behavioral Decision Making

This seminar examines research on the psychology of judgment and choice. Although the normative issue of how decisions should be made is relevant, the descriptive issue of how decisions are made is the main focus of the course. Topics of discussion include choice, judgment heuristics and biases, decision framing, prospect theory, mental accounting, context effects, task effects, regret, and other topics. The goal of the seminar is twofold: to foster a critical appreciation of existing knowledge in behavioral decision theory, to develop the students' skills in identifying and testing interesting research ideas, and to explore research opportunities for adding to that knowledge.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 698: Doctoral Practicum in Teaching

Doctoral Practicum in Teaching
Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Binsbergen, J. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Finan, F. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Harrison, J. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Ishii, J. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Korteweg, A. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Swinney, R. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 699: Doctoral Practicum in Research

Doctoral Practicum in Research
Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Barth, M. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bernstein, S. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Binsbergen, J. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Bowen, R. (PI) ; Brady, D. (PI) ; Breon-Drish, B. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; De Simone, L. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Ferguson, J. (PI) ; Finan, F. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Gardete, P. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Greer, L. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hannan, M. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hasan, S. (PI) ; Heath, C. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Ishii, J. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Khan, U. (PI) ; Korteweg, A. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramer, R. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Kreps, D. (PI) ; Lambert, N. (PI) ; Larcker, D. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Laurin, K. (PI) ; Lazear, E. (PI) ; Lee, C. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; McDonald, J. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; McQuade, T. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Neale, M. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Patell, J. (PI) ; Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rajan, M. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reguant-Rido, M. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Seiler, S. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Simonson, I. (PI) ; Singleton, K. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tiedens, L. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Whang, S. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI) ; deHaan, E. (PI)

GSBGEN 306: Real Estate Investment

The major objective of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamentals of real estate investment. The course covers land economics, market analysis, finance, taxation, investment analysis, investment vehicles, real estate risk, development and urban design. Major land uses are discussed including apartments, retail, office, and industrial. The course is designed for students with limited or no background in real estate.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.nnnThis course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. nnnThis practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important new feature of this course is that a team of external communications coaches work in concert with the professor to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback.nnnIn this course you will learn to:nnn- Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational levelnn- Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documentsnn- Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style nn- Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences nn- Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aidsnnnStudents at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course. In the 2012-2013 academic year this course will only be offered once in the winter and once in the spring term. Waitlists have been long for this course and you're encouraged to keep that in mind as you make your super round selections.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 334: Family Business

Family-controlled private and public companies are the dominant form of enterprise worldwide. Despite their prominence, teaching and research have traditionally focused on analyzing the widely-held model of the firm. The family business management and valuation course explores the unique challenges and opportunities faced by family firms. The course is taught by Leo Linbeck III, Lecturer since 2005 at the GSB and President and CEO of Aquinas Companies, LLC. The course balances managerial perspectives with general frameworks. The course is intended for four main audiences: (1) Students whose family owns a business. (2) Students who are considering working for a family firm. (3) Students who are interested in acquiring a private firm either directly (search funds, minority investments, etc) or indirectly (private equity, etc). (4) Students who seek to consult or provide professional services to closely held firms or their owners (wealth management solutions, management consulting, etc). The main objectives of this course are three. First, to understand the unique challenges and characteristics of family firms. Second, to provide a coherent and consistent set of tools to evaluate the most relevant decisions faced by family firms. Third, to focus on decision-making. The course uses a combination of case studies, guest speakers, and student presentations to explore the central ideas of the course.nn
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Linbeck, L. (PI)

GSBGEN 336: Energy Markets and Policy

Transforming the global energy system to reduce climate change impacts, ensure security of supply, and foster economic development of the world's poorest regions depends on the ability of commercial players to deliver the needed energy at scale. Technological innovation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for this to occur. The complex institutional frameworks that regulate energy markets in the United States and around the world will play a major role in determining the financial viability of firms in the energy sector. In this course we survey the institutional contexts for energy enterprises of all types and consider what kinds of business models work in each setting. We study in detail how markets function for carbon (assessing the advantages and disadvantages of different policy tools and considering in particular California's implementation of A.B. 32); electricity (with extensive discussion of wholesale electricity markets, energy trading, and issues of market power); renewable energy technologies (focusing on ways to manage intermittency and on how renewable energy businesses respond to government incentives); nuclear power (as a case study of how the regulatory process affects investment decisions); oil and natural gas (treating both conventional and unconventional resources and emphasizing the key role of risk management in an industry characterized by uncertainty and high capital requirements); transportation fuels (discussing biofuels incentives, fuel efficiency standards, and other policy tools to lower carbon intensity); and energy for low-income populations, for which affordability and distribution pose special challenges. A primary teaching tool in the course is a game-based simulation of California's electricity markets under cap and trade. Student teams play the role of power companies and compete to maximize return by bidding generation into electricity markets and trading carbon allowances. The objective of the course is to provide a robust intellectual framework for analyzing how a business can most constructively participate in any sector like energy that is heavily affected by government policy. Instructors: nFrank A. Wolak, Director, Program on Energy and Sustainable Development; Mark Thurber, Associate Director, Program on Energy and Sustainable Development
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

GSBGEN 348: The Economics of Higher Education

Topics: the worth of college and graduate degrees, and the utilization of highly educated graduates; faculty labor markets, careers, and workload; costs and pricing; discounting, merit aid, and access to higher education; sponsored research; academic medical centers; and technology and productivity. Emphasis is on theoretical frameworks, policy matters, and the concept of higher education as a public good. Stratification by gender, race, and social class.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
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