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41 - 45 of 45 results for: ETHICSOC

ETHICSOC 276R: Religion and Politics: a Latin American Perspective (ETHICSOC 376R, PHIL 176C, PHIL 276C)

Religion has traditionally been banished from politics in some places in Latin America. Religious symbols may not be displayed in public buildings, political discourse is expected to be free from all religious content, and religious ministers are not allowed to run for public office, among other measures. This course examines the political motivation for this kind of policies towards religion taking a comparative perspective with American and French variants of secularism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 301: Conflicts, Ethics, and the Academy

(Same as LAW 684) This experimental course looks at conflicts of interest and ethical issues as they arise within academic work. The participants will be drawn from schools and departments across the University in the hope that they will offer different examples of, and perspectives on, the issues we discuss. Topics will include the conflicts that arise from sponsored research, including choices of topics, shaping of conclusions, and nondisclosure agreements; issues of informed consent with respect to human subjects research, and the special issues raised by research conducted outside the United States; the ethics of the classroom and conflicts of interest implicating professor-student relationships. Representative readings will likely include Marcia Angell's work, Drug Companies and Doctors: A Story of Corruption, N.Y. Rev. Books, Jan. 15, 2009, and Is Academic Medicine for Sale? 342 N. Engl. J. Med. 1516 (2000) (and responses); William R. Freudenburg, Seeding Science, Courting Conclusions: Reexamining the Intersection of Science, Corporate Cash, and the Law, 20 Sociological Forum 3 (2005); Max Weber, Science as a Vocation; legal cases; the movie "Inside Job"; and conflict of interest policies adopted by various universities and professional organizations.nnnThe course will include an informal dinner. The goal of the course is to have students across disciplines think about the ethical issues they will confront in an academic or research career. Non-law students should enroll in ETHICSOC 301.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 302: EMOTIONS: MORALITY AND LAW (ETHICSOC 202, PHIL 177B, PHIL 277B)

If emotions are the stuff of life, some emotions are the stuff of our moral and legal life. Emotions such as: guilt, shame, revenge, indignation, resentment, disgust, envy, jealousy and humiliation, along with forgiveness, compassion, pity, mercy and patriotism, play a central role in our moral and legal life. The course is about these emotions, their meaning and role in morality and law. Issues such as the relationship between punishment and revenge, or between envy and equality, or St. Paul¿s contrast between law and love, or Nietzsche¿s idea that resentment is what feeds morality, will be discussed alongside other intriguing topics.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Margalit, A. (PI)

ETHICSOC 305R: JUST AND UNJUST WARS (ETHICSOC 205R, PHIL 205R, PHIL 305R)

War is violent, but also a means by which political communities pursue collective interests. When, in light of these features, is the recourse to armed force justified? Pacifists argue that because war is so violent it is never justified, and that there is no such thing as a just war. Realists, in contrast, argue that war is simply a fact of life and not a proper subject for moral judgment, any more than we would judge an attack by a pack of wolves in moral terms. In between is just war theory, which claims that some wars, but not all, are morally justified. We will explore these theories, and will consider how just war theory comports with international law rules governing recourse to force. We will also explore justice in war, that is, the moral and legal rules governing the conduct of war, such as the requirement to avoid targeting non-combatants. Finally, we will consider how war should be terminated; what should be the nature of justified peace? We will critically evaluate the application of just war theory in the context of contemporary security problems, including: (1) transnational conflicts between states and nonstate groups and the so-called "war on terrorism"; (2) civil wars; (3) demands for military intervention to halt humanitarian atrocities taking place in another state. Same as LAW 751.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ETHICSOC 376R: Religion and Politics: a Latin American Perspective (ETHICSOC 276R, PHIL 176C, PHIL 276C)

Religion has traditionally been banished from politics in some places in Latin America. Religious symbols may not be displayed in public buildings, political discourse is expected to be free from all religious content, and religious ministers are not allowed to run for public office, among other measures. This course examines the political motivation for this kind of policies towards religion taking a comparative perspective with American and French variants of secularism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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