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1 - 10 of 18 results for: CSI::socialentrepreneurship ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOE 273: Biodesign for Mobile Health (MED 273)

This course examines the emerging mobile health industry. Mobile health refers to the provision of health services and information via digital technologies such as mobile phones and wearable sensors. Faculty from Stanford University and other academic institutions, as well as guest lecturers from the mobile health industry discuss factors driving needs in the field, explore opportunities and challenges that characterize the emerging mobile health innovation landscape, and present an overview of the technologies, initiatives, and companies that are transforming the way we access health care today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ENGR 350: Data Impact Lab

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GSBGEN 511: Making Social Ventures Happen by Attracting Financial and Human Capital

Social ventures require leadership, funding, expertise, skills and networks to get off the ground, grow and scale. This course will focus on the key strategies for building and leveraging a network of champions to capitalize a social venture at early-stage, and for sustaining and growing that network as the venture grows. This class is applicable to intrapreneurs, changemakers within major institutions, (private or public), board members, impact investors, those who aspire to be senior leaders within social ventures and social entrepreneurs (founders). Co-led by a practicing venture philanthropist and a social entrepreneur, this interactive, pragmatic course will: n- Discuss the critical financial and human capital needs of organizations and companies at different life stages. n- Explore the concept of champions and the different types of champions including board chairs, co-founders, mentors, faculty advisors, donors, investors, community evangelists, and fellow entrepreneurs. n- Learn about effective networks and how to build them, including the role of communications, relationship-building, and crisis management. n- Explore the concept of a powerful vulnerability and the art of "influence without authority" in attracting financial and human capital to the mission and making social ventures happen. Special emphasis will be given to developing co-founders and founding teams, boards and funders/investors as champions. n- Develop a roadmap for the ways you will support social ventures throughout your career. n- Meet social entrepreneurs and their champions who promote them within various power structures (major corporations, government, the institutional funding community) to learn about the successes and failures of their partnerships. Guest speakers will be posted prior to start of class. n- Invite you to join instructors, guest speakers and fellow students for casual dinner on both Wednesdays after class.n- Get to know your fellow classmates who share a passion for addressing the world's intractable problems and for creating systemic change.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 514: Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies

GSBGEN 514 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (2 Units)nnThis course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import more »
GSBGEN 514 - Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies (2 Units)nnThis course addresses the distinctive challenges and opportunities of launching high-potential new ventures in developing economies. Developing economies are attractive targets for entrepreneurs because many are just starting to move up the growth curve, and they offer low-cost operating environments that can be great development labs for potentially disruptive innovations. They increase in attractiveness when their political institutions stabilize and they become more market-friendly. At the same time, developing economies pose serious challenges. Pioneering entrepreneurs take on significant risks to gain early mover advantages. Specifically, entrepreneurs will not be able to count on the same kind of supportive operating environments that we take for granted in the developed world. They often face cumbersome permit and licensing processes, poorly developed financial and labor markets, problematic import and export procedures, unreliable local supply chains, weak infrastructure, corruption, currency risks, limited investment capital, lack of financial exits and more. This course is designed to help would-be entrepreneurs - both founders and members of entrepreneurial teams - better understand and prepare for these issues as they pursue the opportunities and address the challenges to start, grow, and harvest their ventures in these environments. nnGSBGEN 514 is a seminar/discussion format in which students will read about and discuss the key challenges described above and potential solutions. Guests will describe their own startup and investing experiences in developing economies and answer questions. A framework based on the World Economic Forum (WEF) report on "Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Around the Globe and Company Growth Dynamics" will be used to structure the course. Each student will prepare a short write-up as a final assignment on a case chosen from a selection provided by the instructors. Note: Groups of students who want to work as a team to investigate a specific new venture idea in addition to participating in the seminar/discussion sessions should contact the instructors about doing a 390.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

ME 206A: Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability

Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures in developing countries for a specified challenge faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 206B: Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability

Part two of two-quarter project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Second quarter emphasizes prototyping and implementation of specific projects identified in first quarter. Students work in cross-disciplinary project teams. Industry and adviser interaction, weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Prerequisite: 206A.n(Jointly offered as GSB OIT333B) Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and intera more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/index.html for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 334: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/index.html for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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