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1 - 10 of 25 results for: CSI::projectcourse

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and intera more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CEE 224Z: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Z)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 402: Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools (EDUC 236)

Practicum in designing and building technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. Students use software toolkits and state-of-the-art fabrication machines to design educational software, educational toolkits, and tangible user interfaces. The course will focus on designing low-cost technologies, particularly for urban school in the US and abroad. We will explore theoretical and design frameworks from the constructionist learning perspective, critical pedagogy, interaction design for children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 402L: Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab (EDUC 211)

This course is a hands-on lab in the prototyping and fabrication of tangible technologies, with a special focus in learning and education. We will learn how to use state-of-the-art fabrication machines (3D printers, 3D scanners, laser cutters, routers) to design educational toolkits, educational toys, science kits, and tangible user interfaces. A special focus of the course will be to design low-cost technologies, particularly for urban school in the US and abroad.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 289A: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

FEED Lab is a 3-4 unit introductory course in design thinking and food system innovation offered through the FEED Collaborative. Targeted at graduate students interested in food and the food system, this course provides a series of diverse, primarily hands-on experiences (design projects with industry-leading thinkers, field work, and collaborative leadership development) in which students both learn and apply the process of human-centered design to projects of real consequence in the food system. The intent of this course is to develop students' creative confidence, collaborative leadership ability, and skills in systems thinking to prepare them to be more effective as innovators and leaders in the food system. This course is mandatory for any student wishing to qualify for the FEED Collaborative's summer Leadership and Innovation Program, in which select students participate in full-time, paid, externship roles with collaborating thought-leaders in the industry. Admission is by application: http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 289B: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

Primarily a follow-on course to EARTHSYS 289A, this course is an experiential education platform that enables students already experienced in design thinking to collaborate with faculty and industry thought-leaders on projects of real consequence in the local food system. A select cohort of students will work in small, diverse teams and will interact closely with the teaching team in an intentionally creative and informal classroom setting. Students will deepen their skills in design thinking and social entrepreneurship by working on projects sponsored by leading innovators in the FEED Collaborative's network. Some projects may turn into summer internships or research projects for students interested in continuing their work. Admission is by application: http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 303: Designing Learning Spaces

Project-based. How space shapes personal interactions and affords learning opportunities In formal and informal settings. How to integrate learning principles into the design of spaces and develop a rubric to assess the impact on learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (ENGR 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Thille, C. (PI)
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