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1 - 10 of 66 results for: CSI::health ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIO 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 273: Biodesign for Mobile Health (MED 273)

This course examines the emerging mobile health industry. Mobile health refers to the provision of health services and information via digital technologies such as mobile phones and wearable sensors. Faculty from Stanford University and other academic institutions, as well as guest lecturers from the mobile health industry discuss factors driving needs in the field, explore opportunities and challenges that characterize the emerging mobile health innovation landscape, and present an overview of the technologies, initiatives, and companies that are transforming the way we access health care today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Bioengineering department labs at Stanford present recent research projects and results. Guest lecturers. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation. Aut, Win, Spr (Lin, Riedel-Kruse, Barron)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOMEDIN 215: Data Driven Medicine

With the spread of electronic health records and increasingly low cost assays for patient molecular data, powerful data repositories with tremendous potential for biomedical research, clinical care and personalized medicine are being built. But these databases are large and difficult for any one specialist to analyze. To find the hidden associations within the full set of data, we introduce methods for data-mining at the internet scale, the handling of large-scale electronic medical records data for machine learning, methods in natural language processing and text-mining applied to medical records, methods for using ontologies for the annotation and indexing of unstructured content as well as semantic web technologies. Prerequisites: CS 106A; STATS 216. Recommended: one of CS 246, STATS 305, or CS 22
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 251: Outcomes Analysis (HRP 252, MED 252)

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 256: Economics of Health and Medical Care (BIOMEDIN 156, ECON 126, HRP 256)

Institutional, theoretical, and empirical analysis of the problems of health and medical care. Topics: demand for medical care and medical insurance; institutions in the health sector; economics of information applied to the market for health insurance and for health care; measurement and valuation of health; competition in health care delivery. Graduate students with research interests should take ECON 249. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and either ECON 102A or STATS 116 or the equivalent. Recommended: ECON 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOS 250: Interdisciplinary Drug Discovery

Focuses on decision making in science, with particular attention to skills for identifying when to solicit interdisciplinary input, and how to guide such discussions to productive endpoints. Uses case studies based on Novartis projects to teach ways to leverage interdisciplinary knowledge, effectively communicate across disciplines, and drive teams to decision points. Two-day workshop presented by Novartis scientists who lead participants through these real life examples of interactive teams within pharma solving problems through collaborative decision making. Participants develop collaborative decision making skills highlighted through group exercises.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 223: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (HUMBIO 123)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Rosas, L. (PI)
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