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1 - 10 of 10 results for: CSI::food-ag ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EARTHSYS 185: Feeding Nine Billion

Feeding a growing and wealthier population is a huge task, and one with implications for many aspects of society and the environment. There are many tough choices to be made- on fertilizers, groundwater pumping, pesticide use, organics, genetic modification, etc. Unfortunately, many people form strong opinions about these issues before understanding some of the basics of how food is grown, such as how most farmers currently manage their fields, and their reasons for doing so. The goal of this class is to present an overview of global agriculture, and the tradeoffs involved with different practices. Students will develop two key knowledge bases: basic principles of crop ecology and agronomy, and familiarity with the scale of the global food system. The last few weeks of the course will be devoted to building on this knowledge base to evaluate different future directions for agriculture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 289A: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

FEED Lab is a 3-4 unit introductory course in design thinking and food system innovation offered through the FEED Collaborative. Targeted at graduate students interested in food and the food system, this course provides a series of diverse, primarily hands-on experiences (design projects with industry-leading thinkers, field work, and collaborative leadership development) in which students both learn and apply the process of human-centered design to projects of real consequence in the food system. The intent of this course is to develop students' creative confidence, collaborative leadership ability, and skills in systems thinking to prepare them to be more effective as innovators and leaders in the food system. This course is mandatory for any student wishing to qualify for the FEED Collaborative's summer Leadership and Innovation Program, in which select students participate in full-time, paid, externship roles with collaborating thought-leaders in the industry. Admission is by application: http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Archie, P. (PI)

ESS 282: Designing Educational Gardens (EARTHSYS 182)

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing 's sustainable agricultural systems based at the new Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on the design of a new educational garden and related programs for the Stanford Educational Farm. The class will meet on 6 Fridays over the course of winter quarter. Class meetings will include an introduction to designing learning gardens and affiliated programs, 3 field trips to exemplary educational gardens in the bay area that will include tours and discussions with garden educators, and work sessions for student projects. By application only.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/ for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 334: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/ for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 306: Food, Health & Nutrition Entrepreneurship

Americans spend nearly 7% of their income on food items and another 5% on food services annually (US Census). Food spend is at the intersection of two of the most important industries in the US: health care and agriculture. Food production today supports the food consumption causing our extraordinary burden of disease; 75 cents of every dollar of the $4.8 billion spent annually on health care is for diet-related disease. The health care system accounts for over 17% of U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Agriculture and agriculture-related industries contributed 4.8% to the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) in 2012. This course focuses on the shifting landscapes across these industries and subsequent market opportunities in food, health, and nutrition. The course is designed for students with a broad interest in the food or health systems and/or who are interested in careers in related fields. We will examine the food system from three points of view: the consumer, nutritional science, and policy. The class will focus on solving for consumer needs from the perspective of a health-promoting entrepreneur. The class will involve lecture, discussion, and prominent guest speakers who are entrepreneurs themselves or industry leaders.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Duswalt, M. (PI)

SURG 230: Obesity in America

Prevalence and effects of the obesity epidemic in America and the growing prevalence of associated comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, and joint problems. Risk factors, multi-disciplinary treatment options, the role of food in society, patients' perspectives, and current research in the field.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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