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31 - 35 of 35 results for: CSI::economicdevelopment ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who leads Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: Bannick, M. (PI)

URBANST 107: Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

An investigation into urban planning as a democratic practice for facilitating or mitigating change in society and the built environment. We will engage in professional planning practices in focused sessions on transportation, design, housing, environmental policy, demographic research, community organizing and real estate development. Strong emphasis on developing an understanding of the forces that shape urban and regional development, including cultural trends, real estate and labor economics, climate change and the environment, and political organizing and power dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Raya, M. (PI)

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies (HISTORY 107)

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)
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