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341 - 350 of 446 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MKTG 574: Rethinking Purpose

We assume happiness is stable, an endpoint to achieve our goal to chase. It's not. Recent behavioral research suggests that the meaning of happiness changes every 5-10 years, raising the question: how might we build organizations and lives that cultivate happiness? Research suggests it is better to aim for meaning. In Rethinking Purpose, we explore how to rethink purpose in work and life. Students will hear from guests and take a field trip to see how Google has reconsidered purpose. Building on the principles for Solve for X ( www.solveforx.com), a platform encouraging moonshot thinking to solve huge problems in the world, we'll harness design thinking principles to create personal moonshots and a path to continue to find those moonshots over the life course. Lastly, we'll map out how to use time in ways that would help build innovative teams, products, and ultimately lives that have positive, meaningful, lasting impact in the world.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

MS&E 190: Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis

Guest lectures by departmental practitioners. Emphasis is on links among theory, application, and observation. Environmental, national security, and health policy; marketing, new technology, and new business strategy analyses. Comparisons between domains and methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 193: Technology and National Security (GS 167, GS 267, MS&E 293)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 243: Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 256: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices (BIOE 256)

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new health technologies are critical success factors for product commercialization. This course explores the regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, as well as common methods of health technology assessment. Students will learn frameworks to identify factors relevant to the adoption of new health technologies, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases of bringing a product to market through case studies, guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry, and a course project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)

MS&E 256A: Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new medical technologies as a key component of product commercialization. The regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, and common methods of health technology assessment. Framework to identify factors relevant to adoption of new medical devices, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases. Case studies; guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Pietzsch, J. (PI)

MS&E 263: Healthcare Operations Management

With healthcare spending in the US exceeding 17% of GDP and growing, improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare services are urgently needed. This class focuses on the use of analytical tools to support efficient and effective delivery of health care. Topics include quality control and management, capacity planning, resource allocation, management of patient flows, and scheduling. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets, probability, and optimization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 292: Health Policy Modeling

Primarily for master's students; also open to undergraduates and doctoral students. The application of mathematical, statistical, economic, and systems models to problems in health policy. Areas include: disease screening, prevention, and treatment; assessment of new technologies; bioterrorism response; and drug control policies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 293: Technology and National Security (GS 167, GS 267, MS&E 193)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they've learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February, see hacking4defense.stanford.edu. Limited enrollment. Course builds on concepts introduced in MS&E 477.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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