2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

71 - 80 of 105 results for: CIGH::*

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 290: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, MED 226)

Enrollment limited to graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with consent of instructor only. Introduces research methods for conducting studies involving health in low-income context. Focuses on developing a concept note to support a funding proposal. addressing research question of student's interest. Skills developed include developing a compelling research question; synthesizing a focused literature review; selecting and adapting appropriate study design, target population, sampling methods, data collection and analysis; addressing human subject issues; developing productive cross-collaboration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

LAW 558: Workshop on International Security, Law, and Social Science

Societies throughout the world face pressing security and international cooperation problems involving insurgency, transnational crime, risk regulation, migration, arms control, and related areas. This seminar, based at Stanford's university-wide Center for International Security and Cooperation covers a variety of issues of interest for a multi-disciplinary audience of social scientists, lawyers and legal scholars, and natural scientists, among others. Issues include nuclear weapons proliferation and arms control, war and civil conflict, international and transnational organizations, governance, counter-terrorism, biosecurity and global public health, and migration.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

MED 10SC: Responses to the AIDS Epidemic

This course focuses on the HIV epidemic, contrasting the origin and spread of HIV and AIDS in Africa and the emergence of HIV in the U.S., in particular the history of HIV in San Francisco and the Bay Area. We will meet the people and visit the institutions which played key roles in the Public Health prevention, care, and treatment of HIV in San Francisco and consider the impact of HIV globally in our thinking about epidemic disease and the international responses to HIV. This will include key locations in the City, including the AIDS Grove, San Francisco General Hospital, the San Francisco Department of Public Health, the Castro, and local AIDS service organizations. Students will also hear from patients, physicians, and activists who are living with AIDS. We will also meet with scientists at UCSF, Stanford, and local pharmaceutical companies who are at the forefront of new prevention, therapeutic, and diagnostic research. By examining the relationship between the emergence of Gay activism and AIDS in California and New York and the pandemic in Southern Africa, the course will emphasize the multi-disciplinary and multi-sector approach to epidemic infectious disease. How sis physicians, patients, epidemiologists, pharmaceutical companies, and policymakers develop effective responses to the AIDS epidemic? What are we learning from Africa and what can Africa learn from us about how communities react to deadly threats from infectious disease.nAIDS experts from the Stanford community and Africa are invited to share their perspectives with us. In preparation for the seminar, you will be required to read And the Band Played On and Barnett and Whiteside's AIDS in the Twenty-First Century and selected scientific articles. As part of a group, you will also develop an AIDS-related project of your choice which you will present on the last day of class. Sophomore College course, applications required, due 12noon April 5, 2016. To apply, see http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health

Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, IPS 290)

Enrollment limited to graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with consent of instructor only. Introduces research methods for conducting studies involving health in low-income context. Focuses on developing a concept note to support a funding proposal. addressing research question of student's interest. Skills developed include developing a compelling research question; synthesizing a focused literature review; selecting and adapting appropriate study design, target population, sampling methods, data collection and analysis; addressing human subject issues; developing productive cross-collaboration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Discussions in Global Health

The goal of this interactive series is to encourage students to think broadly about the variety of activities encompassed within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers, in responding to large-scale health crises, building health systems, and caring for patients in developing countries. Examines challenges in global health such as organizing medical responses to natural disasters, providing healthcare to societies in conflict, and integrating traditional and modern approaches to healing. Case studies are used to critique strategies employed by organizations that work to improve medical care in poor settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints