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11 - 20 of 22 results for: CARDCOURSES::humanrights

GERMAN 136: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (COMPLIT 136, COMPLIT 336A, GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 336: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (COMPLIT 136, COMPLIT 336A, GERMAN 136)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 123: Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications (CHPR 223)

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMRTS 104: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, SOC 186)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the more »
(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. The Directive (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") is supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these different forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? Working closely with Stanford Hospital as the client, students will not only look at current literature on the topic and build on past practicum research, but also conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists with the goal of finding out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the what one might call the living law of the Directive and the POLST. The ultimate goal is policy recommendations to improve the forms and associated laws and to examine alternative approaches. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 805R: Policy Practicum: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

Client: National Women's Law Center. This practicum continues policy research and advocacy undertaken in Spring 2017 (see description below). Day/Time: TBD scheduled in accordance with registered student availability. Students will refine and finalize policy and procedures , including suggestions from clients and stakeholders, and the priorities that emerged from "The Way Forward" Title IX Conference in Spring 2017 at Stanford Law School. We will seek further feedback from legal, survivor, and other stakeholder groups, and work in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) to disseminate the findings and recommendations to the target end-user groups. This Practicum builds on the skills of thinking about law in an integrated way and situating policy in a direct social context where it can be more readily applied. The project provides students with first-hand experience in gaining a broad and nuanced understanding of emerging social, legal, and policy dilemmas. Given all the more »
Client: National Women's Law Center. This practicum continues policy research and advocacy undertaken in Spring 2017 (see description below). Day/Time: TBD scheduled in accordance with registered student availability. Students will refine and finalize policy and procedures , including suggestions from clients and stakeholders, and the priorities that emerged from "The Way Forward" Title IX Conference in Spring 2017 at Stanford Law School. We will seek further feedback from legal, survivor, and other stakeholder groups, and work in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) to disseminate the findings and recommendations to the target end-user groups. This Practicum builds on the skills of thinking about law in an integrated way and situating policy in a direct social context where it can be more readily applied. The project provides students with first-hand experience in gaining a broad and nuanced understanding of emerging social, legal, and policy dilemmas. Given all the controversy surrounding sexual assault on college campuses, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. The goal of the practicum is to produce a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted to different market segments and stakeholders (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Enrollment is limited and preference will be given to students enrolled in the Spring 2017 Seminar/Policy Lab Practicum. Students from CS or EE or who have coding and have an interest in the design and building of the online platform would be welcome to join the Policy Lab as well. Over the past four years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students)experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government has stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It covers the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examines current cases as well as the rapidly evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden students' understanding of the subject matter. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

LAW 7047: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

I apologize in advance for the fact that there are no paragraph breaks in this description. It is not my fault. Please contact me directly if you have questions about the class and I will email you a more readable description. Thanks, MLD. Seminar with Concurrent Policy Lab: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures. Policy Lab Client: National Women's Law Center: Over the past six years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of th more »
I apologize in advance for the fact that there are no paragraph breaks in this description. It is not my fault. Please contact me directly if you have questions about the class and I will email you a more readable description. Thanks, MLD. Seminar with Concurrent Policy Lab: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures. Policy Lab Client: National Women's Law Center: Over the past six years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. While the future of federal enforcement under the Trump Administration is uncertain, schools are still subject to federal and state law that require them have policies and procedures to address sexual harassment and violence. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It will cover the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examine current cases as well as the rapidly-evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden the class's understanding of the subject matter. Students in this seminar will have the opportunity to participate in the invitation-only national conference entitled The Way Forward: Title IX Advocacy in the Trump Era, which will be held May 1-2 at Stanford Law School and is organized in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center. See [ http://conferences.law.stanford.edu/thewayforward-title9/] for more information on the conference. Concurrent Seminar and Policy Lab: The seminar is taught concurrently with the Policy Lab (also entitled "Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures"). All students registered for the seminar participate in the Policy Lab, which works with the National Women's Law Center toward the development of a set of evidence-based and legally compliant model policies and procedures. Given all the controversy, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor is there any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. Students will analyze cutting-edge issues related to school-based gender-motivated violence and work on a white paper for the NWLC that includes both legal and empirical research into the policies and procedures currently in use around the country. Throughout the class, students will have the opportunity to reflect on what they are learning and how it applies in a professional context. The eventual goal of this Policy Lab is the development in conjunction with NWLC of a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted for different market segments (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Course Schedule and Optional Travel: The first three weeks of the class there will be two meetings per week, on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:15 to 6:15. Students will meet with Fatima Goss Graves, Senior Vice President for Program at the NWLC during week 2 to hear her expectations regarding the project and ask questions. During weeks 4-6 the class will meet once per week, on Thursday from 4:15-7:15 and small groups will work on their assigned sections of the project. On Thursday, May 4 (week 5), the class will meet with special guest Catherine Lhamon, former Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights and have the opportunity to discuss the project with her and receive her feedback. During Week 7, the class will take an optional trip to Washington DC to present the completed project to the staff of the NWLC on Friday May 19. The class will be housed at Stanford in Washington from Thursday May 18, and will attend a hearing of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in the morning of May 19 and then present their project in the afternoon. Travel expenses (other than incidentals) are provided. On Saturday, May 20 we will have the option to meet with other policy makers and activists as well as sightsee (including an attempted visit to the National Museum of African American History). We will return to Stanford on Sunday May 21. There will be no class during week 8. Enrollment, Assignments, and Evaluation; The Seminar and concurrent policy lab are both open to law students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. The seminar has two sections. Section 1 is a 2-hour seminar and students enrolling in Section 1 must also enroll in the Law 805R Policy Lab (1-hour). Section 2 is a 3-hour seminar, and students may enroll in that Section without concurrent enrollment in the Policy Lab. Regardless of the section of enrollment, all students will do the same assignments and be evaluated on the same criteria. All students will complete written work equivalent to a 26 page research paper. Law students will receive "R" credit for the seminar. Elements used in grading: Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LIFE 145: Trauma, healing, and empowerment (CSRE 145H)

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice com more »
Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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